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Architect/engineer speak involved...

No telling what they meant or if its consistent thruout the funnies...
 

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what's the difference between an anchor rod and a threaded rod?

You know all-thread. An anchor bolt is probably cut to a specific length at the factory, and only the last 4” to 6” is threaded.
 

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I've seen a lot of all threads done like that. Cut to length, screw a nut on one end and weld it.

Light posts are installed like this around here. They use 1-1 1/4" allthread for those.
 

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Safety Third
Red Seal Carpenter
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I've never used all-thread for a detail or large scale building like this. On large commercial or industrial jobs we would get a steel fabrication shop to make our anchor bolts with a nut and washer welded to the bottom for embedment and only 6-8" of thread on top. And I have also never seen an anchor bolt with a splice in it, regardless of how much higher the column is from the initial pour. That's a weak spot in my mind, and would need an RFI. The formsavers are a nice touch to keep all the slab hook bars out of the way though, I like that.
 

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I've seen a lot of all threads done like that. Cut to length, screw a nut on one end and weld it.

Light posts are installed like this around here. They use 1-1 1/4" allthread for those.
There is a large office complex nearby where they are installing solar panels in the parking lot, they have a container trailer full of galvanized all thread in bundles about 3ft long. They use 4 - 6 of them bolted to plywood with a nut at the bottom, they drop that into the rebar cage when the concrete is poured. Well over 100 posts
 

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There is a large office complex nearby where they are installing solar panels in the parking lot, they have a container trailer full of galvanized all thread in bundles about 3ft long. They use 4 - 6 of them bolted to plywood with a nut at the bottom, they drop that into the rebar cage when the concrete is poured. Well over 100 posts
Yeah, in an application like this galvanized hardware is typical. Inside a large structure not so much.
 

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Red Seal Carpenter
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Shane ... I had to look up the dayton formsaver. I read the spec sheet but don’t understand the purpose.
Typically we've used them in situations where it would make stripping a form nearly impossible, like needing dowels through a 24' x 30' alumibeam prefab panel you strip with a crane. Hard to see in this picture but the circles inside the block out are formsavers to carry a suspended wall through this tank. The dowels just thread into the formsaver (which is the hook end of the bar in this case)



In the OPs detail it's definitely not necessary since the hooks face into each other, but at the top of walls it can eliminate having large slab hooks sticking out while you button up and pour the wall. This picture has slab dowels sticking out which made forming and stripping a bit more of a challenge, but set down in the wall. Can't find anything with hook bars at the top of the wall on short notice, sorry.


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Red Seal Carpenter
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So its a threaded device thats cast in place, for future rebar or anchor bolts.
Yeah basically the ones I've typically used are the hook end of your bar, with the female thread. Then you can spin on your male threaded straight section, as long as required, after stripping. Haven't seen them reversed but I clearly haven't seen everything yet lol.

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