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master hacker of wood
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I Have too stain a huge deck area, I'll get some pics,

It's mainly walkways, handicap ramp, and a new trellis deck,

Here's the thing his mobile home is grey ish with some blue additions,

He wanted to go grey ish ! Solid base as well,

I'm thinking a cedar wood color would pop better, you can only have too wood look once and can always solid it later,

And a semi transparent would go on easier wouldn't it?

I washed all the wood , after I fixed his water sillcock. It split over winter so when he used it he was spraying water in the wall.

The skirting will stay gray,

What would you recommend color wise solid/ semi transparent!
 

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master hacker of wood
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea I realize that, it's not up to me he wants it done !!

I built all the decks there so,,,, I picked every piece of lumber too make sure it's as good as it can be.

After all the years I have a bend in a hand rail I'm going to cap it with a 5/4 board for him.

But that and he already paid in full for the job so it's getting stained but what lol

I'm not into refunding money ,, I got too make it lol
 

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Semi transparent stains suck, ya they look good but not for long. I use an oil base deck primer by Cabot then a solid latex stain the best you can find (that doesn't mean Behr). But you better use kiln dried PT lumber or let it dry 6 months before staining. Doesn't matter that you hand picked the lumber there's no telling what it will do later. I probably wouldn't use 5/4 for a rail cap either.
 

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Tinstaafl said:
That's one of the main reasons PT warps and checks--uncontrolled wetting/drying. Better to stain it early even if it's still relatively high in moisture content, with a followup after it's had time to dry at a slower rate.
I tried that and I didn't work well. Used some TWP on a new table that had been out in the sun for 2 weeks. The oil just sat on the surface. I sanded to open up the surface and hit helped a little but still pooled on surface. I then thought I would try on my boys swing set I built last year from same material and after pressure washing and letting dry for 2 days it soaked that oil up like a sponge. I done a wet on wet coat and it was still sucking it up. The stuff on the table left a oily film that flaked off a few days later in patches. Looked like crap after that. Built a new one and I'm leaving it for 6 months now.

Here's the deck I pressure washed after 2 years of nothing on it. I wouldn't want to leave it much longer than that though before staining.



Deck Wood stain Wood Hardwood Floor




Wood Hardwood Wood stain Lumber Deck
 

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That's one of the main reasons PT warps and checks--uncontrolled wetting/drying. Better to stain it early even if it's still relatively high in moisture content, with a followup after it's had time to dry at a slower rate.
If you don't let it dry the stain will fail, I'd rather fix bad boards than to fix failed finishes. If I have to use PT on a new deck I only use kiln dried.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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I tried that and I didn't work well. Used some TWP on a new table that had been out in the sun for 2 weeks. The oil just sat on the surface.
I haven't used TWP, so I'm not familiar with it's specific characteristics. It's a given that damp wood won't absorb anything as well as dry wood.

My main point is that to keep the wood itself in good condition, it must be allowed to dry slowly.
 

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That's a interesting article Tin. Never knew what each component of the CCA did. Strange they say to apply finishes straight away though. If I remember TWP say 1 year but I have heard 6 months is fine as a minimum. if the woods dry I guess its fine to apply straight away. I always try to follow products instructions and putting it on sooner def seems the better way to me. I'm gonna try on my new table in a couple weeks and see how it goes on compared to my 1 year old swing set.

My table weights half what it did 2 weeks ago so its def got way less water in it. just not sure enough to apply a oil. A water born may be ok though.
 

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BCConstruction said:
That's a interesting article Tin. Never knew what each component of the CCA did. Strange they say to apply finishes straight away though. If I remember TWP say 1 year but I have heard 6 months is fine as a minimum. if the woods dry I guess its fine to apply straight away. I always try to follow products instructions and putting it on sooner def seems the better way to me. I'm gonna try on my new table in a couple weeks and see how it goes on compared to my 1 year old swing set. My table weights half what it did 2 weeks ago so its def got way less water in it. just not sure enough to apply a oil. A water born may be ok though.

Here's some figures for today

New wood from lowes 32.3% moisture (stain wouldn't soak in)
2 weeks after install 26.3% moisture (stain still beads on surface)
1 year old 10.2% moisture (stain soaked in like sponge)

I will try and apply some to that table in another 2 weeks and see how it does and its moisture content. I would prefer to apply them sooner than a year too.

I will measure that material
 

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That's a interesting article Tin. Never knew what each component of the CCA did. Strange they say to apply finishes straight away though. If I remember TWP say 1 year but I have heard 6 months is fine as a minimum. if the woods dry I guess its fine to apply straight away. I always try to follow products instructions and putting it on sooner def seems the better way to me. I'm gonna try on my new table in a couple weeks and see how it goes on compared to my 1 year old swing set.

My table weights half what it did 2 weeks ago so its def got way less water in it. just not sure enough to apply a oil. A water born may be ok though.
I don't care what they say, no way will I stain brand new PT wet lumber. It's not gonna make a difference water or oil base if it doesn't soak in it won't work. It will peel off. I'm not saying the wood has to be completely dry for semi transparent stains but dryness deep enough for the stain to soak in.

Now I do believe that there are products available to be applied to wet lumber to keep it from drying out too fast and warping, splitting, etc. but they are not finishes or stains.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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If I remember TWP say 1 year but I have heard 6 months is fine as a minimum.
That's a good brand, so you'd think they know what they're talking about. However, many things get accepted as fact or best practice simply because "everyone says so", without any actual detailed studies being done.

Case in point: Many cell phone manufacturers include instructions not to use the device near a gas pump, despite the fact that there has never been a single documented case of one being proved to have started a fire. :rolleyes:

As for finishes peeling, there are basically two types--one which forms a coating over the wood (which will always peel eventually, no matter how it was applied), and one which is meant to penetrate. The latter will only peel if it's way overapplied and left to dry in puddles on top of the wood.
 

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That's a good brand, so you'd think they know what they're talking about. However, many things get accepted as fact or best practice simply because "everyone says so", without any actual detailed studies being done.

Case in point: Many cell phone manufacturers include instructions not to use the device near a gas pump, despite the fact that there has never been a single documented case of one being proved to have started a fire. :rolleyes:

As for finishes peeling, there are basically two types--one which forms a coating over the wood (which will always peel eventually, no matter how it was applied), and one which is meant to penetrate. The latter will only peel if it's way overapplied and left to dry in puddles on top of the wood.
You don't suppose the manufacturer of TWP has tested their products? And over applying and puddling is no different than not soaking in. I've seen it happen even on cedar decks that weren't weathered long enough. Staining over a mill finish is another example of stain peeling due to it not soaking in. A solid stain is no different it also must penetrate the wood and it won't peel like paint.
 
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