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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this were its at for the best miter clamps? I'm a framer, but am doing some interior work on my own house,(some day ha) and want it to look perfect. Figure I'll precut all the window casings, glue up, biscuit etc..
 

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If you are a framer and just looking to have something around for finish the Collins Clamps are the way to go. Cheap enough not to worry about if they are making you money or not, but on the other hand well worth the money.

There are others but they can get quite expensive for just occasional use.

Final answer......buy em!:thumbsup:
 

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One other thing you might want to consider if you don't want to buy the clamps is 2p-10 glue. I still have not used it but many do and I am wanting to really bad but for some odd reason have not pulled the trigger. But a kit of 2p-10 would be right around the price of 4 clamps and the clamp tool for the Collins Clamps so....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well basically I'm doin replacement windows throughout my house. I know the existing window trim will not need to be changed, except for the stops. I figure while I've got the tools out etc, I mine as well just "tune up" everyone, and start over with 2 1/2" colonial casing, and leave the sills, since the existing trim is basically 1x4 with a quarter round routered edge...
 

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The Collins clamps are one of the best purchases that I've made. I've only used them a handful of times over the last few years, but they paid for themselves on the first job.Make sure to get the pliers with them, those things are a b*tch to spread by hand :jester:

I just bought the 2P-10 kit that was mentioned above, haven't had a chance to really try it out yet, though I did a small test with a couple of shim shingles, couldn't separate them, as hard as I tried, I ended up snapping one of them. Super Glue for wood :clap:
 

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Hartford clamps or clam clamps will provide unmatched clamping pressure for glueing up casings. Another option, and usually my preferred option, is to find a trim shop in your area that will preassemble the casings. It's often a very efficient option.
 

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diplomat
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2p-10 has changed my life. I can swing an assembled 3 piece door casing like a baseball bat 30 seconds after glueing it. 10 ounces goes a long way too. Maybe 200 doors and windows.
 
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Golden view said:
2p-10 has changed my life. I can swing an assembled 3 piece door casing like a baseball bat 30 seconds after glueing it. 10 ounces goes a long way too. Maybe 200 doors and windows.
Maybe I'm not doing something right but I don't find this to be the case. I do love 2p-10. But it certainly doesn't seem all that strong to me. Especially on joints that have some leverage on them when you carry them. What thickness are you using?
 

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I found the 2p-10 to be great glue, but it has a short shelf life so only buy what you need. The whole kit gives you options, but you end up using only the one that works for your application. The rest went bad for me within a year. Maybe they were at the store too long before I got them.

I got a set of spring clamps from Woodcraft and they are great to glue the casings together. I often biscuit, use titebond II, tack in place and clamp in place With the spring clamps. Works great and looks good too. They do not leave the 5 gripper marks on the side of the casing. Just a single point.
 

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Maybe I'm not doing something right but I don't find this to be the case. I do love 2p-10. But it certainly doesn't seem all that strong to me. Especially on joints that have some leverage on them when you carry them. What thickness are you using?
Thick or gel. My trim profiles are pretty fat, that may add strength. I have not used it on mdf.

I've never broken a joint during carry but I have broken an outside base corner when I was was off by a degree and tried to force it in.
 

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It's amazing how much collins clamps can improve your quality. I went back and forth on them, then bought a bunch. Great decision.
 

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Collins makes a second type of clamp. Its a spring with 2 hooks on the ends. Its designed to work with their Miter Tite system. They are designed to exert pressure on the short point of the miter. I have had success with small casing using either Ulmia clamps or Collins pinch clamps in combination with the springs.
 

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Collins clamps and clam clamps are not interchangeable. Each serve their purpose. Small moldings, returns, etc., either the 2p-10 (thick) or tb2 Collins clamp and maybe a pin is as good as it gets.

For casing I almost always use the clam clamps. When used with biscuits the joint becomes bomb proof. If you're worried about the 4 or 5 holes the pins make, take an Allen key and back out a couple lower pins. Sometimes the casing is in a corner and won't fit with the clam clamp on it. If I don't have time or space to leave the clamp on while the glue dries before nailing, I'll substitute with a Collins clamp.

After pre-assembly with the clamp, nail the casing to the jamb with 18 gauge gun. I usually do all the trim with 18 gauge just to the jamb, then when I'm done I'll go back with the 16 gauge and nail to the wall. If the jamb is a little proud of the wall, or if the wall is not flat, it helps keep the casing from bending and stressing the miter.

If you're removing 1x4 and replacing with 2 1/2" colonial, think about how that will look with your stool. The ears may become too long. The ears should overhang the same amount the stool projects past the casing, I usually use 1/2-3/4". Maybe add a backband?

If you're doing stain grade, a few things I like to do, even with paint grade. Space your nails evenly, and keep them straight across. I use an 18 ga. on the inside and a 16 ga. nail on the outside. Nothing bothers me more than to see sloppy nail patterns. Even spacing between nails and in a straight line across the casing. Also, I like to turn the gun perpendicular to the grain. My guns leave an elongated hole. By turning perpendicular to the grain, the hole runs in the same direction as the grain, easier to blend in. If you can catch it in a grain, it hides real well. But sometimes with casing you can't do that without getting sloppy nail patterns. But it works great face nailing flooring or saddles.

This is just my experience. Id love to hear if anyone has different methods or if my techniques are no good. Always trying to learn.
 

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Oh yea I forgot, keep a cup of clean water and a (preferably) old toothbrush to clean the glue off the casing right away. A little blow of air from the compressor helps too.
 

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gbruzze1 said:
Collins clamps and clam clamps are not interchangeable. Each serve their purpose. Small moldings, returns, etc., either the 2p-10 (thick) or tb2 Collins clamp and maybe a pin is as good as it gets.

For casing I almost always use the clam clamps. When used with biscuits the joint becomes bomb proof. If you're worried about the 4 or 5 holes the pins make, take an Allen key and back out a couple lower pins. Sometimes the casing is in a corner and won't fit with the clam clamp on it. If I don't have time or space to leave the clamp on while the glue dries before nailing, I'll substitute with a Collins clamp.

After pre-assembly with the clamp, nail the casing to the jamb with 18 gauge gun. I usually do all the trim with 18 gauge just to the jamb, then when I'm done I'll go back with the 16 gauge and nail to the wall. If the jamb is a little proud of the wall, or if the wall is not flat, it helps keep the casing from bending and stressing the miter.

If you're removing 1x4 and replacing with 2 1/2" colonial, think about how that will look with your stool. The ears may become too long. The ears should overhang the same amount the stool projects past the casing, I usually use 1/2-3/4". Maybe add a backband?

If you're doing stain grade, a few things I like to do, even with paint grade. Space your nails evenly, and keep them straight across. I use an 18 ga. on the inside and a 16 ga. nail on the outside. Nothing bothers me more than to see sloppy nail patterns. Even spacing between nails and in a straight line across the casing. Also, I like to turn the gun perpendicular to the grain. My guns leave an elongated hole. By turning perpendicular to the grain, the hole runs in the same direction as the grain, easier to blend in. If you can catch it in a grain, it hides real well. But sometimes with casing you can't do that without getting sloppy nail patterns. But it works great face nailing flooring or saddles.

This is just my experience. Id love to hear if anyone has different methods or if my techniques are no good. Always trying to learn.
Well, since you asked..

I think your method is spot on. That's a good thing. It's pretty much the same thing I do.

I was going to mention clam clamps being in a different class. Until you use them you can't understand how well they work. And yes, the biscuits added to the miters do make a big difference. Both in alignment and strength.

Bob
 
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