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New to all this and about to start blasting on the weekends. So much great and eye-opening info on this site. My question is should I invest in a CO monitor? Is it an OSHA requirement. I will be using a 3 cuft pot and rental 185. If OSHA requires then I'd like to get the Clemco in-helmet monitor but I'm told it isn't certified as on fit in a Nove 3, only in an Apollo. Advice please?
 

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I use an Apollo 60 helmet. My compressor is an old Joy 185 1980s era. I bought a cheap co sensor $30? It is about the size of a programmable thermostat. Plenty of room to just set it in the helmet. I used it several times and it did not go off so now it just sits in the truck. I know the sensor works because it went off one day while I was idling the engine and the truck filled with fumes.
 

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Those hardware bought CO sensors will not pass the test. They must be NIOSH certified.

And as far as OSHA only going after multi million dollar companies, that is false information. I've been on plenty of jobs where OSHA showed up and the company was no where near a multi million dollar company, much less a million dollar company. If you have as much as one employee, then you fall under the OSHA regulations. If you are caught breaking one of the regulations, then most chances you will be penalized no matter how small of a company you are.
 

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Painter213 is correct. I live on an island and have seen osha show up at a job site, single family residential home, small time contractor.

I know my cheap unit will not pass the grade for osha. It was just to give me some peace of mind. Like I said I filled my truck with fumes while I was working on it. I could hardly smell the fumes when the alarm went off so I think I am ok.

Carbon monoxide is a dangerous gas. It is tasteless and odorless. The only way to be sure it is not there is to use a sensor. Be sure there is adequate distance between your exhaust and air inlet. The exhaust should be higher than the air inlet. Most of the guys I know don't give it a thought.

If you have one employee, if anyone but you uses the equipment you need to be very aware of the laws and follow them. That is why I will always be a sole proprietor.
 

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Has anyone actually got nailed for these monitors?? We use one for every 4 blasters and painters we use. I have never seen a failed reading. We use the standard purifiers which everyone has and have never had a problem The army corp of engineers made us buy this big crazy machine last year which cost $27000 and that thing never gave an alert once im starting to think the whole thing is a joke especially how clean compressor air is now days
 

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The CO isn't particularly coming from the compressor exhaust guys, but can mostly be generated by the over heating of the oil that is used to cool the compressor screws it's self. When the compressor oil gets to a certain temp it will start to emit CO and thus a big problem. The air purifier is there to only remove oil, water, odor, and particulates "dust", but generally nothing for removing CO unless it is a specialized filtering system. Yes, equipment can and is expensive, but much cheaper than an accidental death of a employee. Not only in money but also emotional strain as well. Remember, you cannot see it, taste it or smell it. Work safe guys.
 

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Your breathing source for air should never be an oil based source, like your compressor, even with an air purifier attached. Oil with always get through which isn't good. You are better off buying an a standalone compressor which doesn't contain any oil as your breathing air source.
 
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