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I can't believe this hasn't been discussed yet. Could everyone please share their method of cleaning your brushes. I use warm water with a brush comb. Seems to work just fine but not as clean as I would like. I use a very good quality 2 1/2" sash brush for cutting in and trim work. I replace my brushes typically once, twice, or three times per month. I really think it's worth the expense.
 

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Seeing as you spend good money on quality brushes, you should invest in a roller/brush spinner. I don't paint professionally but I have painted enough homes to have warranted the cost ($25 Cdn.) of buying a spinner. I have extended the life of more brushes and rollers that it has paid for itself over and over again. I bought my first one over 15 years ago and just had to replace it this summer. Also, another benefit is that you can usually use the brush/roller with another colour soon after you've cleaned it.
 

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Very true but I find that now matter how much I clean a brush/roller there always seems to be a bit of paint left. When I use the spinner some watered down paint still comes out. However, I think you can never really get all the paint out. I find the spinner really helps extend the life of all my brushes and rollers.
 

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You replace your brushes up to 3 times a month? How much money do you make on your jobs? When I break for lunch, all the brushes get cleaned. This includes thorough rinsing with water and detergent soap along with a stiff wire brush combing it out. And then it goes into the spinner, which is invaluable. I find that when a brush accumulates some dried paint from a job, even after cleaning it. That on the next job, using that brush again, the new paint has a 'dissolving' effect. That is to say, when I go to clean the brush, the older paint will come off as well. Anyways, I have some Purdy brushes that are 3 years old, and look brand new. What brand of brushes do you buy? And you think maybe you could mail me your used brushes? :)


-PlainPainter
 

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took the words outta my mouth plain..."send me your used brushes" although i've only just started this as a business, i've painted several hundred walls in the past 25 years. my favorite brush is probably 20 years old. a friend of my dad hand makes paint brushes, and gave me a few a long time ago. this 2" sash brush seems to get better with age, holds paint very well, all the bristles will keep a straight line while finishing trim and windows. twice i've used automotive paint remover to loosen the old paint (then cleaned) and a spinner does get rid of the crap hiding inside the ferrule(?) when he makes a brush he uses all split ended bristles, the S.S. ferrule is rivited to the handle, the bristles are all shaped in a bundle, set in epoxie for a minute or two, then set into the ferrule. i only know that caused i've watched him make brushes before. he says the way to keep a good brush "good" is to allways spin it clean ... never even heard of a spinner till he told me that.
 

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Spinners work good, I usually go with the 'kick it out' on the toe of the boot style. Always clean with a wire brush, rinse thoroughly, comb it out, and replace in sleeve immediately. I buy 3" Wooster Pro Badgers by the case (12), 2-3 cases will last a year if we are doing a lot of painting, longer if wallpaper is dominating.

A tip: heavy duty clear wallpaper adhesive will eat latex paint. If you have a brush with some paint dried on the bristles (not rock hard, but some surface leftovers), dip it in the adhesive for a day and it wire brushes right out.
 
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