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I don't think so!

There is definitely a limit and a reason for it. By code you're only allowed to use 80% of a breakers capacity at any given time. This means that for a 20 amp breaker, you can only load it 16 amps. You'll have to determine what the load is gonna be on that circuit, and keep it to that. Use ohm's law.
 

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Excuse me "unregistered". As far as the NEC is concerned there is NO limit as to how many receptacles can be put on a 15 or 20 amp circuit. 220.3(B)(10) He specifiaclly stated receptacles.
Commercail there is a limit. 220.3(B)(9)

If you know of an article which limits the number of receptalces in a 15 or 20 amp residential application please post it here. :Thumbs:
 

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Interesting concept, predetermining load on receptacles. I can't tell you how many homes that I have been in that have installed 6 ways over duplexes or that have terminal strips plugged into half of a duplex.
Today it's really amazing that we don't see more electrical fires.
 

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smiley said:
how do i determine how many receptacles can be on a 15 or 20 amp branch circuit
I would trust speedy Pete on this. One thing he didn't say was if you know that an outlet will be for a high demand use such as a microwave or space heater giving it a dedicated circuit is a good idea.

Jim Bunton just a painter.
 

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Speedy is correct
commercial you calculate them at 180va, keeping in mind the continuous load issue. Residential - no limit (go figure)
 

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For 110 volts, 15 amps breaker max load is 1,655 watts .
For 20 amaps, breaker max load is 2,200 watts.
The design guide line is 80 % of max load. It is good to have no limit on the receptacles. But it is a good idea to know the average load on the circuit before adding a new receptacle. You don't want to add a receptacle for customer sump pump when the circuit is close to 80% load. Your customer might not think of you highly.
 

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louis bugaj said:
For 110 volts, 15 amps breaker max load is 1,655 watts .
For 20 amaps, breaker max load is 2,200 watts.
The design guide line is 80 % of max load. It is good to have no limit on the receptacles. But it is a good idea to know the average load on the circuit before adding a new receptacle. You don't want to add a receptacle for customer sump pump when the circuit is close to 80% load. Your customer might not think of you highly.
While the 80% "guide line" might be a good idea, it is not in the code for a dwelling and is unenforcable. It is enforcable for commercial work. This "80% rule" is quite often misapplied, but causes no hazard when it is misapplied. Any intermittant load or group of intermittant loads (loads that run less than 3 hours) may be loaded to 100%.
 

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What is enforceable is the AHJ. In my area 10 max per circuit!
 

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jbfan said:
What is enforceable is the AHJ. In my area 10 max per circuit!
I'm always amazed at how the little local Nazi's think they know better than the 1000's of people in the code making panels who spend years revising the NEC every three years. I can really only advise as per the straight NEC. It's up to the installer to figure out how the locals might have perverted the NEC.
 

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I also forgot, in the county that I live in you can not run 14 gauge on any new circuits, or on new construction. Not sure about the city, never had a job there.
 

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jbfan said:
, in the county that I live in you can not run 14 gauge on any new circuits, or on new construction.
Residentially, especially for lighting circuits, that is just flat out STUPID!!!

Have your opinions either way, but to outlaw #14 entirely is a joke.
 

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In my experience, all I care about is the service. For example, a small project may require a 200 Amp service for construction purpose temporary power. That is about what you'd want for a medium sized home.

The way I see it, the service Amps are more important than how many receptacles you wire up to a breaker. That is, if the circuitry proves inadequate, a re-design is needed. But who made you an Electrical Engineer?

If there was only one trade I was able to understand more, despite my age, it would be electrical. Common sense need not apply here, lol.

(My son studies for Electrical Eng. degree)

Electricity confuses me.
 

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Interesting concept, how many receptacles on a residential circuit? WOW not that really depends on the load your applying and if you expect to get paid.

Where do these idiot come up with these questions?
 

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voltamp said:
Where do these idiot come up with these questions?
Totally uncool response, voltamp. Not only did you reply to an old thread, you insulted someone who was obviously trying to learn something in the process.
 

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voltamp said:
Where do these idiot come up with these questions?
Well Mdshunk, now EVERYBODY knows that good old voltamp definitely has had to many voltamps and that obviously makes him sooooo special !

Smiley, you asked a great question. Sorry good old voltamp = holier-than-thou commented on your Q.

Suggest you ask your local building dept how they see it (if they use same standard for both comm/ res.) If you are a do-it-yourself, look in an electrical book from Lowe's or HD and ask some E contractors working in your area what they typically do. If they are getting green tags, what they do will work for you too.

Just becaues Speedy Petey says there is no limit (brilliant - and not an answer) you want to be practical and safe. I noticed that you didn't mention if your question related to commercial or residential.

Hey good old VA, it would be "Where do these idiots..... or Where did this idiot......." Stick to pulling wires and lay off the boards.
 

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Hey sixpack, your criticism of voltamp is warranted, but your smart ass remark to me was NOT. Not a good way to make a first impression with your first post.
My answer is code correct. There is NO code limit. If you owned a code book you would know this. Also, if you read past the first of my two sentences in that post you'd see the common sense answer I gave. I'll quote it so you can read it again in full.
For residential there is no limit.
Most stay at around 12 for 20 amp and 10 for 15 amp.
 
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