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While this is a DIY question, I am posting it here also because I feel that I need some "expert" advice.

I am finishing my basement and will be adding 8 circuits. The circuits are planned, and the boxes have been hung.

My question is this:

In order to minimize the time the power is off, and in my opinion, to make it easier on myself, I would like to wire the circuits to the panel first and make runs to junction boxes where I will cap the wires until I am ready to continue.

This makes sense to me in that:
* I can run a full length of conduit (yep, it's code) to the panel and pull the wires while turning off the main once.

*I can test the circuits immediately before adding fixtures.

*Once I have wired a complete circuit, I can test it by simply flipping on the corresponding breaker.


While this seems like the way I would like to proceed, are there any problems with my logic, or any pitfalls that I am overlooking?

Thank You
 

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DRIFTWOOD
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8 circuits for a basement? is this woolworth? as a rule you can have 8- 15 amp outlets on a breaker . normally the rough wiring is installed. then breakers popped in main panel .are you running a new feed from main to sub panel in basement? that may be best
 
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dritwood said:
8 circuits for a basement? is this woolworth? as a rule you can have 8- 15 amp outlets on a breaker . normally the rough wiring is installed. then breakers popped in main panel .are you running a new feed from main to sub panel in basement? that may be best
Actually, it's a 1600 square foot basement with 7 rooms including a media room full of electronics, a 20' bar w/ microwave/pizza oven/blender/4 TVs, and extensive lighting including recessed/sconces/switched receptacles.

I am not adding a subpanel. My box has 15 open breaker slots and a 200A main breaker. While 7-8 circuits may seem excessive, since I have the slots and the juice, I'd rather be safe than sorry. I'd hate to add circuits in the future because the ones that I originally installed become overloaded.

My main reason to start at the panel is that I can test the circuits to make sure that everything works properly. I am a DIYer, and although I have planned this to excess, I'd hate to have to run new wires when everything is done.

Any further advice would be appreciated.
 

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I don't understand your question. Just run the wires for the circuits - starting at the panel or starting in a room and ending up at the panel it makes no difference. Energize them and test the home runs back to the box, (you won't be able to test every box since your rough inspection requirements will not allow all your wiring to be conneted down stream) then flip the breakers off and call for your rough inspection. After the rough passes you can connect everything in the rooms and test away.

By the way the basement you are describing is a very ambitious DIY job.
 
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