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I have an old house with 4"x8"x16" cinder block exterior walls. The headers are the old precast cinder one piece units. The interior side of the block is 3/4" lumber glued and screwed to the block with drywall over top. I want to avoid modifying/touching the block. Years of poor repairs to the door frame have taken a toll on the block ends. I'm wanting to replace the door, and I also want to get some space for new electrical and insulation. I'm considering framing a 2"x6" wall on the interior side and moving the door to this new wall, resulting in a recessed doorway. I would remove the siding on the exterior and wrap the block ends with aluminum. This portion of the house is on a slab, and the existing door sits directly on the slab, so I would need to build a masonry "cant" onto the portion of slab left exposed from the recess. I'm a skilled tradesmen, but have never attempted this type of door modification task, any guidance would be appreciated.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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25,217 Posts
I've rebuilt door framing inside some pretty ratty openings without issue. The big thing is whether there's enough block intact for anchor points--and there almost always is.

Is there a particular reason you want to go with 2x6 framing rather than 2x4? Most people prefer to shrink the inside space as little as possible.

For your "cant", it shouldn't be too tough to take out some of the concrete in that area and re-do it.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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That's a valid enough reason given your location. :thumbsup:

So what part of the job do you actually need pointers on?
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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25,217 Posts
The only negative I see is the extra concrete work at the threshold. If you're okay with that, full speed ahead. :thumbsup:
 
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