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The water coming off of those upper valleys is gonna be running fast and probably overwhelm those lower gutters.
Fireplace location seems odd too. Like it will be blocking view from a window perhaps? Rendering looks nice though, but I am just thinking it through to the build stage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The water coming off of those upper valleys is gonna be running fast and probably overwhelm those lower gutters.
Fireplace location seems odd too. Like it will be blocking view from a window perhaps? Rendering looks nice though, but I am just thinking it through to the build stage.
No one uses gutters here, and with the gravelly materials we have for soil and base, no drainage or water problems occur.

The fireplace is just a gas-burner unit, a zero clearance thing from someone like Heat'N'Glo. Stack may get done in stucco instead of the stick-on phony stone shown.

The house got built on Lake Minnetonka out W of Mnpls, MN, about 15 years ago, and was shown in an article in Better Homes magazine. I just used it as the key for doing this model of it in Chief Architect.
 

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The rendering looks great. The grass looks to perfect in one area and patchwork in the other. Maybe some consistency my be on order. But if you are copying it from a picture...so be it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No eaves up top?
Nope. The top end is done in the abbreviated-eave shingle style seen all up and down the coastal areas of ME, NH, MA, CN, and NY. Hurricane Bill just cleared out, and if you have ever experienced a winter nor'easter there, it can seem worse than a hurricane.

Google for real estate listings on Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard, Block Island, and any of the Hamptons out on Long Island, and you'll see lotsa houses with abbreviated eaves like this one.

Two good reasons for abbreaviated eaves. One is just plain old cost, driven by Yankee thrift, and the other is that with nothing hanging out there, there is less for hurricane-force winds to fiddle with and wreck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A rendering done inside the same house

Here is a view of the master bath, and another exterior shot taken 180 degrees from the one in post #1.

The bath is up on the second floor, on the south end of the house, the same end as the garage doors.

I've not much used the POV-Ray rendering engine that Chief Architect has included within the software package. This one shows my first attempt at doing an interior with a little lighting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
May I ask how long it takes you to render a house like that ?

Terry
Rendering time depends on things such as the number of surfaces in the model, the lighting specifics, and the settings chosen for shadowing, anti-aliasing, and more.

The exterior shots like that shown can be rendered in a few minutes, while for the interior shot, rendering can take more like ten minutes. If I jack up the settings to get more photorealistic, the POV-Ray software might take hours, and I would let it run overnight.

Chief Architect permits exporting to a format used by the rendering package Kerkythea, which runs a lot faster than POV-Ray.

But maybe that is not what you were asking. Starting with a blank screen, a house like that shown with the level of detail on it and in it can take anywhere from a couple hours to a few days to model. It all depends on whether you want to include stuff like tableware, rugs, do custom textures, etc. What you see here is just a quickie from a beginner.
 
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