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My Dad has almost no athletic ability but a strong work ethic and the ability to fix or build almost anything. At a rather young age, although not as young as when he started working, he taught my brothers and I both the work ethic and the ability to build stuff. And at 82 he is still at it.

No offense to those Dad’s who taught their sons to play ball, but how many kids end up making a living from some sort of sport?
 

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As I mentioned in the other thread I never had a dad but my Grandpa had me packing lumber, tools, mixing concrete you name it as he raised me. The carps then did slab to roof as I learned to do the same as many others on here. Back then didn’t know it would be my means of living but I sure am glad & proud it all fell in place for me. Rest In Peace Grandpa & thanks for showing me the way of a true honest successful living
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Dad was a pencil pusher and he couldn't teach me much because he would hire others to do things other than simple maintenance. Must have gotten the builder gene from my Grandfather. But he didn't teach me much as he didn't want to be bothered when he was building furniture.
 

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Son of a son of son of a son of son of a son of a carpenter or cabinet maker. Nothing but love and respect for what and how my Dad taught me. Rock solid basics and the genes took it from there, but it was always up to me if I wanted to walk the family path. As it is for my sons. Time will tell.
 

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Yep

My moms pop taught my old man and he taught us. Will never repay my appreciation for his teaching me to make an excellent living and lifestyle

Taught me a mean pulling technique and pass rush stuff too

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Not only did my dad teach me how to lay brick but he also taught me how to run a business as well. Now I can officially say I’m a third-generation contractor/bricklayer.

A lot of times growing up I despised him because any day that I had off school he drug my ass out at 5 AM to go to work but I am grateful for that because it has made me a better man today

Cheers and thank you dad for everything that you did for me and thank you for working your tail off to provide your family a good life


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My dad always wants (and wanted) to fix stuff, but he doesn't have the skills for it. So I learned with him, yet fighting him often on the method to do it. I just spent two days cleaning out his garage, and geez am I finding interesting stuff (that he has never used, nor ever will). I got my knack from my grandfather (his father).
 

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3rd generation roofing, siding. 2nd generation with gutters. Learned how to do these trades early in my life. Grateful for that. Learned how to run a business by watching my father run his for many years and I simply did the opposite.


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We darn sure have some great history here & all the great learning, paying attention, long days & our Pops & Grandpa’s grinding the great trades into us makes us all hold our heads up high. We’ve probably got thousands of years of history in the trades between us all
 

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Sister's first husband taught me the trade. He was a great guy and had lots of patience with me.

But damn, I wish she would have married a lawyer instead of an electrician to mentor me.

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I got my work ethic from Dad, my 14th birthday was spent going to stores and applying for jobs. We grew up in a fixer upper he was constantly working on even though he has almost no idea what he was doing.

I was the only one allowed to help as I showed interest. I went to tech school and found a job in the trades once I got my license. Growing up broke and getting a boot in the ass is far underrated.

He went back to school in his mid 40's as his job was getting shipped overseas. He watched all his coworkers get laid off as he was moving up in the company. Seeing your dad work 50 hrs a week and go to school at his age was an eye opener.

Not that he taught me the trades but he sure did get me started. I am lucky for my old man and my first and only boss. Boss wasn't a great person, but was one of the best carpenters I ever met. The day I started my company I didn't have to pay rent to pops anymore. He's retired now in FL and enjoy's me sending pictures of our jobs.
 

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My step dad tinkered around the house, and often got in over his head. No Google back then, so it was all trial and error. Didn't learn much if any construction from him, but his work ethic is carried by me to this day. I don't recall him ever calling off sick for work.
 

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My dad was by no means a carpenter but he is one hell of a worker and businessman.

We work in commercial alarms sales and was the best in the country lot of years. He also always had a side business. Started buying and flipping government surplus and took that money and bought rentals. Had 14 at one point.

I spend many of weekends fixing the rental and painting them. He would occasionally hire a GC for the bigger jobs and I was always present helping and learning.

Once I graduated high school I started doing repair work and property management for him while in university. That cascaded into quoting university and being a carpenter full time.

If it wasn’t for his help there is no way I would be in business for my self. I still call him with my business questions all the time.
 

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My Dad was a jack of all trades and quite literally, the master of all of them.

He was an amazing Father and a doubly amazing craftsman. Cabinetmaking was his forte but he was equally at home with electrical, engine repair and construction.

He never pushed anything on me. If I wanted to hang around and learn...fine. If not, that was fine also. I learned most of what I know through the school of hard knocks.
 

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This is probably one of the better Father's day threads, even if it wasn't meant that way.

Didn't have much connection with my dad. He had 2 master's degrees. I was always a worker. I did inherit his brains and probably his work ethic, to a point. Rarely saw him, growing up. He worked alot. 7 to 4, home for a nap, then 5 to 9, at least.

About the end of 9th grade, I figured out, school isn't a hard thing. I could do that easy and still work 40 hours a week.

Now, my son has worked with me for years. He works harder than I do, these days. I try to convince him to slow down. He didn't get my IQ, or my dad's IQ, but he can out work anyone I've ever met.

Now to reality. I push him, to find a better life. A better job. One with benefits and retirement. He resists, and I understand, because I've been there. Traded in my tie and dress shoes long ago. Sure, I won't have as easy of a life, but I can't be in an office. Hopefully, one day, I can convince him to take one of many jobs he's been offered, that has benefits.

Of course, as I type this, I'm sitting in my office. What I never liked, but here I am.

Dad only gave me one compliment in my entire life. It was toward the end. Don't be that father.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Build it guy - Sounds like your are not the Dad you had and you obviously are doing things right if your son is following in your footsteps.

Urge your son to save and invest for his future, perhaps some rental properties.

Working for someone else you deal with other issues that aren’t any fun. Company gets taken over, consolidation happens and your whole department is let go. Start over as the new guy somewhere else.

Being self employed you often have to work past 5, to get a job done, but you can schedule in time off when you want to, not send in a request to your boss.
 
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