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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a call this morning and the guy said "My porch collapsed" I went to check it out expecting the standard issue frost damage or rotted old cinder block.

Instead I was literally in shock when I saw it.

Instead of building the wall for the porch and then filling it with stone like everyone ever they actually went through the trouble of building 2x6 supports and joists and decking it with 3/4" plywood and then pouring over it. I huge 22'x6' gap 13 courses high has been under his porch since the 70's.

I told him first thing he needs to do is call his insurance company, then the building inspector. I also told him even if he could keep the porch, it was going to cost a lot of money. I honestly think the whole porch needs to come out, put a new wall it and fill it with stone then pour a new porch that actually has a base under it.



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
did they ask you to repair it lol...
He just wanted ideas.

I told him a repair was out of the question and working anywhere under that porch was way too dangerous anyway.

I told him the guy that built that was probably dead by now and he said "Good, because I would have killed him anyway"
 

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They make great root cellars. Folks had the same sort of thing, only 6x9. Cut out a hole in the wall, took down the 2x4 supports that held the plywood form bottom in place :blink: and viola a root cellar. No failure yet even after 50 years. Different day and time back then :whistling
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They make great root cellars. Folks had the same sort of thing, only 6x9. Cut out a hole in the wall, took down the 2x4 supports that held the plywood form bottom in place :blink: and viola a root cellar. No failure yet even after 50 years. Different day and time back then :whistling
I assume no crippling winters down in Texas either.

The freeze thaw cycle plays some serious hell on structures here.
 

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I assume no crippling winters down in Texas either.

The freeze thaw cycle plays some serious hell on structures here.
The house is in S.E. Wisconsin outside Milwaukee. The practice of pouring the porch slab over hollow was rather common back in the 60-70s in that area.
 

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I agree with SS.....take it out, clean it up, and build back new. A piece of mind is worth a lot of money. You'll be able to get a much better job out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I felt bad for the guy while we were talking about it, he bought the house assuming it was built properly, it is also pushing in on the garage side and his slab is starting to sink.

I am going to prepare a price for the whole project, but I won't be able to fast track it since I am booked until almost July right now.

Hopefully if he can't wait the person he chooses does it right.
 

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The house is in S.E. Wisconsin outside Milwaukee. The practice of pouring the porch slab over hollow was rather common back in the 60-70s in that area.
I have one as well, and we've built a number of them on new homes also. The difference is that the entire porch is supported by walls on 4 sides, and sufficient rebar is added so it supports itself. Not sure what's going on in the pictures posted......:eek:
 
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