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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Buddy just bought a 90 year old house. While pulling wire through a chase, I discovered a cracked and leaking hub on the sanitary tee in the 3" cast iron stack. This hub is the one that receives the 3" horizontal waste. Location of the leak is between the first and second floor. The second floor bath is all tile, including a chase within the room, which has tight internal dimensions. The first floor chase is larger (12" x 24", and has access via a small closet. I'll probably open the wall, as well. The laundry room is directly below.

In situations like this, can the CI be removed without disturbing the 2nd floor bathroom chase? If not, can the damaged san tee be bypassed, and yet be left in the stack? My plumber is coming tomorrow to look at it, but I'm trying to visualize something other than removing it all. The tile is vintage.
 

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Hard to know without seeing it but I helped my plumber do something similar in a house originally built in the mid 1700's last year. It was a real pain but it worked, we replaced from hub between 1st/2nd floor to basement. Same size closet too. We used wedges to hold upper stack in place, smashed old pipe, new pipe in, no damage.

When I first saw it I said no way, but he was right.
 

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cut out damaged section after you support upper stack.
to repair use rubber boots and pvc pipe and y or you can use ci and lead the fitting
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. Without busting into the 2nd floor bathroom, I don't see where to support the upper stack this time. We'll soon find out.
 

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How bad is the crack. Reason being is I see a cool bit of kit that you wrap around cast iron/ PVC wastes to give a permanent repair. They had a display showing it warped around the cast iron. You just warped it around the crack like a bandage then spray with water and it sets hard as steel. The sales guy said they have sold quite a bit of it. I think they also sell it in HD and lowes but I'm not 100% sure. I tried to attack it with my knife and it was solid. might save you destroying that tile. It's called water activated fiberglass tape.



 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
How bad is the crack. Reason being is I see a cool bit of kit that you wrap around cast iron/ PVC wastes to give a permanent repair. They had a display showing it warped around the cast iron. You just warped it around the crack like a bandage then spray with water and it sets hard as steel. The sales guy said they have sold quite a bit of it. I think they also sell it in HD and lowes but I'm not 100% sure. I tried to attack it with my knife and it was solid. might save you destroying that tile. It's called water activated fiberglass tape.



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It's a significant crack. About half the hub. Dripping at the exact same rate as the dripping tub faucet above.

But I'll tell you what I AM thinking. Since the tee has a bit of a long, raised arm, I'm thinking of leaving it, capping it, patching it, supporting it, and connecting the drain below it. It just might work, especially since the chase has room.
 

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Cast iron can be brazed with the right filler rod, takes a little skill though.
 

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Can a hub be safely brazed given the residual sewer gases in the stack?

Now you've got me thinking of cleaning it, then using an epoxy patch or something. But doesn't do much to keep it from crumbling further.....
If you really want to take a trip to Hackville then do what I did, I had a 2' crack in a cast iron stack so I emptied an entire tube of PL on it and wrapped it in duct tape.

...I ultimately removed it all and replaced with ABS, but the glue tape did the job for an emergency repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you really want to take a trip to Hackville then do what I did, I had a 2' crack in a cast iron stack so I emptied an entire tube of PL on it and wrapped it in duct tape.

...I ultimately removed it all and replaced with ABS, but the glue tape did the job for an emergency repair.
"Hackville." :laughing::clap:
 

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don't try any patch....do it correctly

cut out the damaged piece and repipe it....id recommend repiping it all while the wall/ceiling are opened up

if 1 piece is bad than typically means its all 95% ready to go....its not an isolated thing
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok, so today it was cut out and replaced. Not cheap. Everything vertical was replaced, including the cracked sanitary tee.

They left everything that was running horizontal. A 4" CI street wye led directly into the sanitary tee, and that wye was left in place. They used a 4" x 3" standard Fernco to connect to the PVC. Shouldn't that have been a Fernco "eccentric" fitting so the bottoms of the two pipes were level with each other? Is this going to be a problem area to catch material? Do I need to call them back to change that? Thanks.
 

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I don't have too much advise, but I have used the lenox brand diamond sawzall blades made for cutting cast iron when the wall is too tight to get my snapper in.

They work freakin fantastic for cutting cast iron, and with no sparks. A lil slow, but compared to regular blades its real fast.

I've tried the other brands and the cheaper ones and lenox blows them out of the water.


Dave
 
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