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Hi everyone- firs tpost here.. wife and I have been blessed by the good Lord to buy a piece of land cash - We have the top of the hill, roughly 200 by 100ft to clear, and need to doze a rough driveway up this section-

I drew lines where I would run it, just skipping the bunch of trees on the left where its steep, it mellows out and doesnt seem too much work-

will a little case 310g dozer handle this? The length is around 120 feet from bottom road to top of the hill so not too bad and not huge trees in the way. Im eyeing a case 310 4 way dozer- the top is mostly flat and we can get up to the top to work our way down-




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Hi fstarocka, I'm doing my level best not to sound like a jerk here, but you're in over your head. That hill is steep, and soil likes to move when you undermine it. And that soil probably weighs 100lb/cubic foot. Won't take much to bury you and your new dozer. If you insist on doing it yourself, please visit DIYchatroom.com. This site is for pros.
 

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Can't disagree at all Reggi. A dozer is last machine that you need to get started on this slope.

You won't be able to shove the grade...as with a dozer. You need a sizeable front loader to start at the top and dig out to your grade...plus shoulder and retaining device that would approved by a structural guy when you get to the height that your permit doesn't trigger some engineered drawings.

I truly do appreciate your enthusiasm and willingness to take on the task. Likewise, I question your ability to take on this widow-maker by coming here to ask about the ability of the wrong piece of equipment. There's nothing simple about working along a grade. The old hands can do it because they're flying by the seats of their pants and know exactly WHEN soil is shifting or starting to slide on a sizeable piece of rock....they can feel it in their butts, they can tell by the engine sound nuance of rpm or even a track that broke loose on traction.

Keeping in mind...that road. If it's yours it's gonna be loaded with dirt, rocks and debris that roll down-hill with enough momentum to get there. If it's a HOA or county road...you'll have to deal with them. Also...if it's a HOA or a county road with right of ways, they can stop you unless you do produce your engineering for their review. If the lot is not long enough along the frontage, you may have to sacrifice square footage on top in order to hair-pin that driveway. None of this can be captured on your photo with the yellow lines...if nay-sayers do speak up, it's because there's not enough information as to what you can or can't do and still be able to drive up it to basically carry your house all the way up to the top of the incline and still be able to turn around up top and drive forward back down. That turn-around would also include proximity to where you plan to build as to how it inteferes with staging and access...coming and going.

Get your surveyor to have their PE come up with the drawings you'll need for them to set the center line of driveways as well as stake out the cut on the uphill side and the prep for fill and compaction (and preservation of compaction) on the downhill side.

Once I (as if it were me) have the drawings and the stakes plotted out to meet the property survey....I'd engage a Track-Hoe to take care of the cut and hopefully have sufficient turntable clearance to turn to drop the bucket load to start filling up your shoulder. He can...if he can reach it while on grade....tap it down while filling up the sloped shoulder. Once the rough grade is in and wide enough for everything you'll need to build your house at the top (keeping in mind all trucks; ready mix trucks and some flatbeds, a dozer can probably level it out smooth.

packing the shoulders to stay is a whole 'nuther topic...but it should get you there. BUT....in order to get the trucks, ready mix vehicles and flatbeds....the grade will have to be reasonably pitched; well drained and topped with crushed rock and crushed concrete to keep it negotiable.

Don't do this yourself.

If you're dead set on doing this....do your family a favor and up your life insurance to make it's worth the gamble. General Liability for the property while under construction...even just grading out in the event you take someone with you on your wild ride to the bottom...or any of the survivor's vehicles and claims for trauma when they jump in to locate you and save your life. Gory way to go...but it is a job for someone that runs this type of heavy machinery every day...all day.
 

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Something along these lines:
View attachment 522308
A lot easier to maneuver and cutting with the "broadway" of what was left over after the road crew was through clearing and sloping for the roadway in the photo.

At least that's all I can get out of the photo from this angle. But a hop up and in....bear to the left...up near the top where your lines end and then cut back the final hump to the top.
 

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I have always hated entering road at sharply accute angles. I prefer right angles for traffic vision. There is less rise to top farther up the road. Lower entrance will pronably require a long retaining wall. Higher entrance maybe not.
 

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The trees are the least of your problems. That hill looks to be at least 40’ high. 40’ over 120’ is a steep (33% slope) ass driveway. Fire department wouldn’t allow that here, max. Is 10%
 

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I'd want an excavator, a front end loader and a dozer for that if I planned on making a realistic grade I could drive a car up. And possibly making a switchback but your photo actually looks like you have a good path. And hopefully you have somewhere good to dump because you'll be hauling out a LOT of dirt. And if it's clay, it's a worst case scenario.
 
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