Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a two car garage with attic space above. The pitch is 9/12 and the current roof truss configuration is a "queen post". I want to modify this truss by taking the slanted supports and have them go vertically. and then support the rest as an open plan. I won't actually put in a "ceiling".

My question is this do-able?
What do I need to do to start this? There will be no exterior structure change at all. The only modification will be the truss and then putting in the necessary electricity, flooring, insulation, cabinets, window and door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
This is completely doable. You will need to contact a local Professional Engineer to revise the truss design and sign off on the alterations. His signature will sail it past the building dept and inspections providing the work is done properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
:cool: Thanks Teeterbilt and Hatchet I enjoyed your sense of humor.
So I need to find a local Engineer in Construction to redraw the truss changes. Could I redraw them? and have him sign off on? :cool:
thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
Jeanne, if you are comfortable doing all of the math to determine where and how to relocate all of the different stresses involved go for it. A P.E. is going to have to sign off on it anyway and he will need to see and recheck your calculations which wiil probably take almost as long as having them do it in the first place IF you don't make any mistakes. If there is a mistake he will have to start from scratch and it will cost you more than if you just hired them in the beginning.
I don't know where you are but here in FL a Professional Engineer has to sign off almost all construction plans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I live in Atlanta, Georgia. I understand what you are saying but looking at the two designs, I guess I thought it would be an easy adjustment. I thank you and have gotten in contact with a structural engineer. jeanne in Marietta
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
Jeanne, I am glad that you have decided to go to an engineer. Few other people can understand the ramifications of things such as wind load. An afternoon thunderstorm with winds of only 30 mph can apply tons of downforce on your roof.
Take the link over to DIY/carpentry and see how handiandi miscalculated the support for his hottub and you may appreciate engineers more. We make things safe.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top