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Guys,

I'm about to remodel the room that connects to my garage. We will be bumping the interior room out approx. 3 feet. We haven't yet cut open the sheetrock to confirm if this is wall is load bearing or not... BUT, we think it's non load bearing. I have several questions about the feasibility of framing the new wall:

Question #1:
Can I frame the new wall directly onto my concrete slab? If so, should I cut an expansion join along the new wall? Also, any problem if I decide to build a small masonry wall on top of the slab to match my current foundation?

Question #2:
Should I be cutting the slab "open", digging/pouring a new footing and then framing the new wall on the new foundation wall?

Thanks!

 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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I would attach a pressure treated 2x6 to the garage floor and then build my wall on top of that. IMHO the garage floor makes a great foundation for this purpose.

Rather than building a masonry base, I would just use longer studs that go from the floor to the ceiling.
 

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General Contractor
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You a GC and a Builder and you ask this? You should visit DIY, HO will give you a good advise if you don't know.
 

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You a GC and a Builder and you ask this? You should visit DIY, HO will give you a good advise if you don't know.
Hey, how hard can it be. Print yourself a certificate from the University of Youtube and you can be anything you want. :whistling

Anybody else think the drywall looks odd? Like not enough screws? I haven't slept in two days, maybe I'm seeing things. On the other hand, I wish my seams were all that straight and uniform.

Oh, and I would assume that wall holds up something important, but maybe not.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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Even if his wall is load bearing, I am guessing that the new wall that's 3 feet away will make up for it. But then again, if you want your house to still be standing, maybe you shouldn't take the advice of a low voltage electrician.
:whistling
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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The screws are probably there.. they just didn't cover them with mud.
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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This is a simple project for a Builder. I'm doing one now, except it's a bathroom addition, and the floor levels must meet.


P.S. We usually look in the attic/roof area to determine a load-bearing wall. Taking off drywall and looking at studs ain't gonna tell you much. :thumbsup:
 

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I would attach a pressure treated 2x6 to the garage floor and then build my wall on top of that. IMHO the garage floor makes a great foundation for this purpose.

Rather than building a masonry base, I would just use longer studs that go from the floor to the ceiling.
Why would you use a 2"x6"?
 

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Fine Handcrafted Opinions
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bradesp said:
Guys, I'm about to remodel the room that connects to my garage. We will be bumping the interior room out approx. 3 feet. We haven't yet cut open the sheetrock to confirm if this is wall is load bearing or not... BUT, we think it's non load bearing. I have several questions about the feasibility of framing the new wall: Question #1: Can I frame the new wall directly onto my concrete slab? If so, should I cut an expansion join along the new wall? Also, any problem if I decide to build a small masonry wall on top of the slab to match my current foundation? Question #2: Should I be cutting the slab "open", digging/pouring a new footing and then framing the new wall on the new foundation wall? Thanks! http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bradesp/media/Garage Remodel/GarageWallFraming_zpsf31b1eaf.jpg.html
If you can't look at the roofline, the layout of the house, and the attic framing and know for sure that the wall is load bearing or not, you shouldn't be doing this project. Hire someone who does know for sure.

I'd say there's a 99% chance that it is load bearing, just from the picture.
 

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Highwayman
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Brad, may I explain something to you? This is part of the new, gentler, helpful me. :eek:


These are the kind of posts that get flamed by the regulars here, and here's why.


You title says "Owner-Builder". Nothing wrong with that at all, but it gives us the impression that you don't do this for a living. CT was intended for Pros only, so that's kind of a red flag.


You are asking a question that to any professional builder/remodeler/framer is a simple project.


You have made comments that show that you might not really grasp what is involved, or how to go about doing this project, or even framing basics.

ContractorTalk was not conceived as a tutorial website. There is absolutely nothing wrong with those types of sites, but this is not one of them.


Hopefully this will explain why you might not be receiving the kind of assistance that perhaps you were expecting. :thumbsup:
 

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Brad, may I explain something to you? This is part of the new, gentler, helpful me. :eek:


These are the kind of posts that get flamed by the regulars here, and here's why.


You title says "Owner-Builder". Nothing wrong with that at all, but it gives us the impression that you don't do this for a living. CT was intended for Pros only, so that's kind of a red flag.


You are asking a question that to any professional builder/remodeler/framer is a simple project.


You have made comments that show that you might not really grasp what is involved, or how to go about doing this project, or even framing basics.

ContractorTalk was not conceived as a tutorial website. There is absolutely nothing wrong with those types of sites, but this is not one of them.


Hopefully this will explain why you might not be receiving the kind of assistance that perhaps you were expecting. :thumbsup:



Man you are being nice.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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Because he's a LV guy. :laughing: :thumbsup:
EXACTLY! I'd err on the side of having enough surface area to move my bottom plate around if I don't get the walls exactly plumb or square after nailing them to the ceiling.

I am under the belief that the OP already has this figured out in terms of how he is going to do the rest of the job... even if he employs help to do it. His only question was whether or not he had to build a foundation to match the height of the one holding up the house.
 

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EXACTLY! I'd err on the side of having enough surface area to move my bottom plate around if I don't get the walls exactly plumb or square after nailing them to the ceiling.

I am under the belief that the OP already has this figured out in terms of how he is going to do the rest of the job... even if he employs help to do it. His only question was whether or not he had to build a foundation to match the height of the one holding up the house.


Yeah that's not the way to do it. I thought your rational would be to help spread the load over the 4" of concrete, which I could kinda see but wouldn't really do much.
 
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