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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to float Pergomax laminate wood flooring (which already has a thin, foam underlayment attached) over my above grade concrete subfloor.

I wish to use an additional cork underlayment, but the Pergo instructions advise against it.

Can anyone offer any advice?

Thanks
 

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I would like to float Pergomax laminate wood flooring (which already has a thin, foam underlayment attached) over my above grade concrete subfloor.

I wish to use an additional cork underlayment, but the Pergo instructions advise against it.

Can anyone offer any advice?

Thanks
I think your post answers the question.
 

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Paul
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You could mechanically fasten it to your shower walls over gum drop underlayment if you wanted to. The laminate police aren't going to break in your house and cart you off. The manufacturers specs advise against it for a reason. Asking pros to support an idea that blatantly goes against it so you can ignore it and feel better about yourself is just as stupid a proposition as the first scenario. The reason for it is deflection. The rotating lock system that holds that floor together can't take much more than minimal deflection and still do it's job. Adding padding adds deflection. If you're required to use cork, use a product that doesn't have a pad attached. There are plenty out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You could mechanically fasten it to your shower walls over gum drop underlayment if you wanted to. The laminate police aren't going to break in your house and cart you off. The manufacturers specs advise against it for a reason. Asking pros to support an idea that blatantly goes against it so you can ignore it and feel better about yourself is just as stupid a proposition as the first scenario. The reason for it is deflection. The rotating lock system that holds that floor together can't take much more than minimal deflection and still do it's job. Adding padding adds deflection. If you're required to use cork, use a product that doesn't have a pad attached. There are plenty out there.
MY HOA is pretty loose regarding what type of underlayment is required, but something must be used.

It was my understanding that a cork underlayment has little to no deflection.

Still, a bad idea?

Thanks
 

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MY HOA is pretty loose regarding what type of underlayment is required, but something must be used.

It was my understanding that a cork underlayment has little to no deflection.

Still, a bad idea?

Thanks
I thought PrecisionFloors was clear. It seems as if you want a professional to say, on the internet, that it's OK not to follow the manufacturer's instructions. Why would a pro do that? If you want to do something else, that's your call.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the detailed replies, and I especially appreciate everyone's patience to my entry-level inquiries.

Please know that I'm in no position to question anybody's judgement, or experience. I'm simply looking for the best solution to my particular need. Imagine having never done this before, that's where I'm at.

Having said that, can anyone comment on the validity of this reply I received on another forum?:

"First off, NEVER add more loose underlayment for any floating floor system you use other than what the manufacturer calls for, even if it is pre-attached. It usually voids the warranty and is simply not needed for installation purposes."

"And quite honestly, too much underlayment jeopardizes the integrity of the planks locking together. This can lead to separation and failure of the floor. This is the reason why you can't use extra underlayment."

"With that said, you can still use a pre-attached underlayment on your floor over a GLUED-DOWN cork underlayment. As long as the first underlayment placed down is glued directly to the subfloor, then you are okay. It's only the loose underlayment that can't be put with another."

"As long as you glue down the underlayment above, you can place a flooring with pre-attached underlayment on top of it."

"At minimum, you can use a pre-attached underlayment that comes with your floor, but do not place any added underlayment to it unless it is firmly glued down first."

Thanks, again.
 

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Well you come on a site of professionals with literally millions of square feet of experience, and you still want to go against their recommendations. Maybe it will work, manufacturer says don't do it. So there you go, you can ask for opinions for the next 10 years but you have two ways to go.
 
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