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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
went to see a home owner,gave a solid presentation and sent out an estimate..made the follow up call the other day and i got the old,"call me in two weeks we're still have'nt made a decision yet"//obviously no one needs 2 weeks to make a window decision..some people say they need to prioritize their projects and are'nt sure which to do first,windows or kitchen ect...
 

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Particulate Filter
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You probably missed the opportunity already on this one but you could anticipate it next time around. I think the standard next sales step would be to create urgency. Like "I have a window on my calender right here and it's going to fill up fast; if you don't sign now I won't be able to get them done until next spring." You can also box them in. Studies show that a person will feel obligated to say yes if they've already answered yes three previous times. "I thought the presentation went well, wouldn't you agree?" Yes. You need to have these windows done because x, or you wouldn't have called me right? Yes. We are a reputable company you can trust? Yes. Let me sign you up right now...

Or you can make the if you buy now I'll take off $500 discount offer . Or you can simply do the used car salesman technique; what am I going to have to do to get you into some new windows today?
 

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Web Dude
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Agreeing with nlgutters on this one.

When it comes down to estimates, quotes, whatever is comes immediately before the check gets handed to you, you need to be there in person. Next time, personally deliver the estimate and go over it with them. You can answer any questions and concerns, and of course you can collect that check right there.

Always get them face to face when it comes down to money time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
should i give an in person estimate in writting or verbally? should i ALWAYS give it that day or is it ok to tell them i will be back in 2 days to discuss the estimate?
 

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should i give an in person estimate in writting or verbally? should i ALWAYS give it that day or is it ok to tell them i will be back in 2 days to discuss the estimate?

If someone is getting a few estimates I don't think you would be taken seriously giving them a verbal estimate.

On the timing it just depends, do you know if they already had their other bids? If you don't want to write them an estimate the same day its an excellent idea to set the next appointment before you leave.
 

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if you don't sign now I won't be able to get them done until next spring
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I would respond more favorably if that was rephrased to, " If you can sign now, I think I can get this done as soon as...."

Something about "if you don't sign now" just turns me off.
 

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A story about a salesman that really impressed me a few months ago.

My Dad was looking to get a heat pump system installed for his house. I recommended he get a bid from the HVAC company I use for all my jobs. I call them to set up a appointment and usually deal direct with the owner, he is going to send his son out who handles all the retrofit jobs, etc. whom I have never met. When we meet he looks young possibly straight out of college and nicely dressed. I tell him what we need, this is a large house with 2 air handlers and would like to consolidate this to one air handler since one of the existing ones is in the crawl space. We go over the wants and needs and tell him about the existing construction, insulation and the upgrades to the home, foam board under new Hardi plank siding, etc. He then gets some coveralls on and goes under the house to check the ducts, etc. Then goes up in the attic the check return airs, etc. Then he goes around and measures all windows, walls, etc. Also measured all rooms inside and checked registers before the coveralls.

When he is done I figure he will be off to the office to figure the calcs and bid. But he says give he a half hour or so and he will have it all done. He drove a SUV and opened up the rear hatch and had a computer, printer, and racks of brochures, etc. in there. He does all this work out in the driveway standing under the hatch. When he comes in he has 3 bids with different options on heat pumps from basic to top of the line, all with options like air cleaners, etc. complete with brochures for each model and the options. Bids were complete and listed any power company, government, manufacturer rebates, credits, etc. He then very patiently goes over each bid and explains the differences, advantages, disadvantages, etc. Which models get which rebates and tax credits, or why not. He also explains in detail exactly what they are going to do with the ductwork, air handlers, return air, etc. and what they need from us if we do the wiring instead of their electrical sub, etc.

Overall very professional, knowledgeable, thorough, and you got to like the almost instant professional bid package with brochures.

My Dad didn't bite right then, he needed to get some other bids. He got his other bids, but in the end they got the job. Also the other guys took 2 to 4 days to get back with the bids.
 

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Carpenter
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You probably missed the opportunity already on this one but you could anticipate it next time around. I think the standard next sales step would be to create urgency. Like "I have a window on my calender right here and it's going to fill up fast; if you don't sign now I won't be able to get them done until next spring." You can also box them in. Studies show that a person will feel obligated to say yes if they've already answered yes three previous times. "I thought the presentation went well, wouldn't you agree?" Yes. You need to have these windows done because x, or you wouldn't have called me right? Yes. We are a reputable company you can trust? Yes. Let me sign you up right now...

Or you can make the if you buy now I'll take off $500 discount offer . Or you can simply do the used car salesman technique; what am I going to have to do to get you into some new windows today?
Nice pun!:laughing:
 

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very rarely is the objection what is stated. 'things are not as they seem' are what sales guys say

some will tell you if asked, some will be offended. follow up and see what happens... maybe a little early with a 'i was thinking about project and had an idea that may be of interest...............................etc etc

chances are they were getting their 3 est's or were checking prices and will either ignore your calls, or push you off again because they just can't say no
 

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You didn't give a "solid presentation" if you did not present the numbers right there at the close while they were hot. I never understood the salesmen that give an estimate and have to get back to you with the numbers. That's not an estimate, that's a consultation.
 

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Great story Kgmz. With todays technology there is no excuse for not giving a fully detailed presentation at the time of the consultation. After spending the required time gathering data and getting to know the HO's wants and needs, you excuse yourself to your mobile office and come back with a 'printed' fully detailed scope of work that outlines everything and then go over it with them along with product brochures, powerpoint, whatever. This should be a no brainer for any single trade business such as hvac, roofing, gutters, siding, etc.

Now, out of the other side of my mouth, I will state that it is nearly impossible for me to do what I have just preached on a $75K burnout, addition, or bathroom remodel. I still spend at least 1 1/2 to 2 hours on my first visit. The majority of my sales are closed prior to price. I sell myself and my business way before I sell my products. Dad's a salesman and embedded this in my brain from the time I can remember. People by from the person...not the company, the product, or the price. If they buy off of price, the salesman didn't do his job or it wasn't a properly screened prospect. When I screen potential leads and ask them what the three main considerations in order to most important to least important are for them on this project. If price is anywhere near the top of their list I let them know that price is never a consideration in my proposal because I build the proposal to fit their needs and address all issues that need to be addressed. We don't do patchwork and we don't put on 'half' of our system to get into someones budget. We install things a certain way only. I then politely ask them if they still want us to come by knowing we don't offer any solution based on price. This can be construed as some type of 'shaming' but I use it to kick out the tire kickers.
 

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How to conduct a Bath Remodel estimate:

Sounds like a professional approach Pinnacle. It is not impossible though to accomplish something similar in a bath remodel project. I conduct similar presentations usually lasting under 45 minutes. I try to keep my talk under an hour, just to maintain full attention, unless the customer has a lot of questions, that usually means they're that much closer to buying, so of course I'll stay longer.

I start off by asking "what would you like to see done?" and I shut up and listen. They usually tell you their hot buttons that you need to forfill to close the sale. It may be real suttle, and they may not say exactly, but you will get an understanding of what you need to show them to earn their business merely by being an active listener.
For a bath remodel, I take a picture of their current space and upload it to my Tile-A-Room software on my laptop. If they're wanting to push open walls or move stuff around, I open a ready-made Sketchup model. I can then virtually drag-and-drop from a showroom of 100s of tile textures so they can see how the tile will look. Before I even go to the estimate, I have them tell me which tile samples they would like me to bring that are displayed on the website, so I also have an idea in advance of what sort of accessories, borders, accents, and trim pieces to bring as well.
My estimates are calculated within a Microsoft Access file that I am updating along the way. "So which tile do you prefer?... and you like it in that size for the wall too, or would you prefer the 8" x 10" style?" Then I simply choose the material/size/color from a drop down.
I have samples of plumbing fixtures, glass enclosures, accessories, and of course a grout chart that is carried with me in my mobile office.
Then I have them look through our portfolio while I take my measurements. And I just plug-and-chug my numbers into the Access form on my laptop. From there I print it out using my travel printer. Then I go over each item line by line with the customers reiterating their choices.
Present the number, and the CLOSE.
done
 
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If after a solid and thorough presentation as some of the guys here saidyou get the impression that they will be shopping your bid/ estimate why not say:

"I understand you will shop around all I ask is to be present at the bid openning" as if you were dealing with a municipality.

In other words professionalize the process so later on they can`t bull**** you with statements like "the others were lower", "someone else can do it faster" etc.


If they refuse you prob don`t want to work with them and just saved yourself alot of grief upfront.

If they agree you prob got a fair shake.
 

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Or, while you are taking your measurements, have your customer call a couple of your old clients that are pictured smiling in your portfolio in front of their new remodel.
 
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