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President of the world
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i'v been building cabinets more often and i can't help but wonder what the standards are as far as dimentions go.

i know widths are usually in increments of 3", but this does not apply to custom cabs. i have also learned bu you guys not to make door stiles less than 1 3/4". i'm not sure if there is a standard for placement of pin holes... i usually start them a foot from the bottom and end a foot from the top inset about 2" front and back.

i think 4" is norm for kick on lowers and hinge centers should be about 3" from top and bottom, but now that i got the festool 32 jig for the router i am assuming there is an easier way to lay out metricly.

so if any of you veterans have some tips to make our projects easier, please share the wealth!!!
 

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Sean
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The nice thing about custom cabinets - is that they are custom

3.5 to 4" toe kicks / or in some cases none - make it look like a piece of furniture

I generally start my pin holes with 6 to 8" from the bottom & generally end about 4" from the top (it just depends on what the cab or shelving is for)

Making it easier - dedicated machines / areas or a CNC
 

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Buy out your door and drawer fronts, you will be able to offer way more variety and save time and money.
There are many vendor to choose from check who the cabinet makers in your area get theirs from
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Standard sizes of boxes are in 3" increments. The toekick should be about 4" tall, the actual toe board will be taller because the deck will need to be flush with the top of the lower rail on the face frame (if you build FF cabs like I do). The bottom shelf pin hole is 8" up from the deck and about the same from the bottom of the top rail. The Euro hinge hole should be 4" OC up from the bottom of the deck. This is especially important if you are dealing with lazy susan hardware.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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If you put it lower then it will hit the lazy susan. Don't ask how I know this please. :whistling

This is also for inset doors, I don't think it would happen with overlay doors, which I rarely do.

But 4" is the standard setup by the industry. It doesn't always work, especially with wide short doors like the ones you find in a refrigerator cabinet.
 

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Leo,

I just built this one. The lazy susan is 27-1/2" in diameter, and it fits in a 31-1/2" wide corner base unit. The rotating shelf didn't even come near the hinges...

How do you build yours?
 

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www.true32.com

Bob Buckleys book is a good read for any cabinet maker. It takes a bit to get used to metric, but once you go metric you never go back.

32mm systems are based on that you can build any width cabinet you want, but the hieghts must in increments of 32mm. Toe kicks are typically not integrated, you use adjustable legs, so everything is a frameless box. You can typically use fillers between boxes and moldings to make them look more like framed cabinets.
 

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President of the world
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
www.true32.com

Bob Buckleys book is a good read for any cabinet maker. It takes a bit to get used to metric, but once you go metric you never go back.

32mm systems are based on that you can build any width cabinet you want, but the hieghts must in increments of 32mm. Toe kicks are typically not integrated, you use adjustable legs, so everything is a frameless box. You can typically use fillers between boxes and moldings to make them look more like framed cabinets.
well that explains ikea cabs!

thanks for the info... i'm going to read up on this... and that festool siteis awesome! wish i knew about it sooner

we'll see how my cabinets turn out the next time... if i can sell a job... at least it gives me a bit of time to learn more and practice:thumbsup:
 

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Contractor
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www.true32.com

Bob Buckleys book is a good read for any cabinet maker. It takes a bit to get used to metric, but once you go metric you never go back.

that's funny...when I first remodeled my home somewhere/somehow I got a tape w/ a metric scale on the bottom and used it constantly. It was awesome for all sorts of work b/c taking half of anything in metric was so much easier. Well, fast forward a few years and I am much better at math and more familiar with the 'English' measurement system. A little trick for splitting measurements in half...if you are halfing 1/8, always double the bottom number and leave the top number...1/16. still for the unlearned the metric is a lot easier. :laughing:
 

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Still have all my fingers
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The metric system has long been a pet peeve of mine. I love working with it and I wish the Imperial system was completely abolished. Unfortunately we live in a country where the construction industry is ruled by a stubborn hierarchy that has been resistant to the switch.

I am almost forced to use Imperial because things out of my control are Imperial based, things such as lumber,sheetstock,blueprints,appliances etc. I can either convert everything for my own use and then convert it back for everyone else’s (which is a total PITA) or I can just concede defeat and work within the Imperial system.

Any good numerical system is based off of sets of ten and it works.

"That'll be $12.13/32, sir" Okay, do you have change for this $100? Think about it. You can take your inch and shove it a furlong up your......
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Hey Glen, go pick me up some 5.08cm x 10.16cm x 2.44m

Just doesn't have the same ring as

Hey Glen, go pick me up some 2 x 4 x 8's
 
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