Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a low voltage contractor and our typical installs are alarm systems, cameras, etc. We just did a simple camera install for a small business and pulled a permit for the install. Although, the need was questionable because this camera system was plug-n-play. Premade wires, plug in transformer etc.... No wall penetration etc. But, after 3 of the inspectors debated the issue, they said I should probably pull a permit. Ok, no biggy... here ya go.

Now the job is done and the building is being Finaled so they can open for business and I got a call because the building inspector (not the electrical) would not sign off because my cameras needed to be inspected.

I have never had anyone be able to answer this question (And when I went to the city and asked, all I got was blank stares and shrugs.- I am not kidding)

Anyway, What does the final encompass that my cctv system, and a simple one at that, would prevent the company from opening?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,693 Posts
It's job security/justification.

An inspector can take a ride complete the paperwork and probably justify 3-4 hours of his day closing out your permit.

Just the way it is any more......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Only thing I can think of is wall penetrations for fire stopping. Or if your cables are run in a plenum rated ceiling.
Perhaps, but that is an electrical inspection issue that would eventually get noticed when we did call in the inspection of the permit.

I was not able to get a hold of this particular city's inspector, but I had to be at a neighboring city and I asked that city's inspector. He was just as confused and shrugged his shoulders. He claimed that he certainly would not prevent a company from opening under similar situations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
The work under your permit needs to be inspected. Mostly to verify the cable is rated, you supported everything, and sealed hole you've created. Around here the AHJ usually only requires a permit for plenum ceilings but we require all the data guys to pull a permit regardless. That way when our building inspector says the cable can't lay on the ceiling tile, sprinkler pipe or tied to conduit, the installer gets to deal with it instead of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,076 Posts
It's job security/justification.

An inspector can take a ride complete the paperwork and probably justify 3-4 hours of his day closing out your permit.

Just the way it is any more......
Yep

The work under your permit needs to be inspected. Mostly to verify the cable is rated, you supported everything, and sealed hole you've created. Around here the AHJ usually only requires a permit for plenum ceilings but we require all the data guys to pull a permit regardless. That way when our building inspector says the cable can't lay on the ceiling tile, sprinkler pipe or tied to conduit, the installer gets to deal with it instead of us.
And, it's just how the permitting process works - anywhere I've seen, the building permit can't be finaled until the other permits are closed. In fairness to the BI, he doesn't know (or care) what you've done. It's one point in favor of combination inspectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Yep


And, it's just how the permitting process works - anywhere I've seen, the building permit can't be finaled until the other permits are closed. In fairness to the BI, he doesn't know (or care) what you've done. It's one point in favor of combination inspectors.
The Inspectors and BO's get a bad rap. We generally don't have a problem with them where ever we go. They are part of the team and can greatly impact the success of a project. No different than having a "bad" electrician or DW sub. If all of us contractors did good work, knew, kept up and followed the building code, we may not need them.

Here in VA, the inspectors take low voltage pretty seriously. Years ago a fire started on a deck of an apartment complex and traveled up the exterior wall and got into an unsprinkled attic space. (living spaces had a domestic system) Pretty much burnt to the ground partly because contractors cut holes in fire walls during "minor work" helping the fire to spread from one unit to the next. (Vinyl siding, missing draft stop and no sprinklers in the attic space are other factors) Luckily no one died. The building department took a ton of heat for that fire.

Regardless of how minor we think our work is, one minor mistake by one, then another then another contractor can grow to create a bad situation years down the road. As much as the AHJ's frustrate me and Pi$$ me off, I'm thankful for that second set of eyes checking over our work.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top