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Discussion Starter #1
thanks to Matt and Dom for helping me with this. Last one , and only , that ive done I was maybe laying for 6 months and didnt do much.

Some compromises with it, its not exactly perfectly made regarding the throat placement for functionality but the depth was altered to achieve the look of the faceplace as a whole.



















 

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Discussion Starter #6
In a perfect world it would have been oven wall, insulating material, 4" solid and then exterior brick. I had to forgo the 4" solid and just poured a perlite/porty mix around the oven. I used the thin form material and slid it along the back, side and firebox then poured into it. After a few hours I pulled it out to allow for expansion.

There are interior walls with angle irons in there, corbel back up walls, caps on dead space and another interior wall to carry the chimney upstairs when I brought it in 4".

It has a whole chimney worth of material on the first floor. It was one of those things where Im scratching my head knowing there is way to much material going into this thing but dont know where I could eliminate any of it. So you lay stuff inside the chimney to carry stuff youll do tomorrow or next week all the while being mindful not to put too much direct pressure on the smoke chamber or oven. When in doubt slip another iron in. The oven flue had to be directed over 4' to hit the opening, even then the owner wanted me to hit a number 16" further, but there was no way, it would have been about a 30 degree angle. I think there are 4-5 irons inside that thing jumping over flues, smoke chambers and the oven arch.

I ordered 400 back up bricks and 300 cement bricks for fill plus blocks and some 8" solids and ran out of bricks 2' from the ceiling.
 

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Smarter than the brick...
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What are the clay slabs that you use to do the slants on the shoulders of your throats? Cut flue tile? Never seen them before, I've always just corbled brick and parged them, I like your way better.
 

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Yes for a normal chimney I'll order an 8x18. Some times it takes more than 48" of slabs.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Here is a better picture of the process. Im at least the 3rd generation of hacks doing it like this in this area. We were all brought up doing subdivision chimneys, throat takes like an hour or so.







I lay a course of backer bricks stepped on the slabs on the entire surface. The brick on edge against the exterior is very important to put in on an exterior chimney. 4" there for center chimney for a total of 8".

I save my fireplaces for last or a rain day if I can, so I either use the arch technique like I posted before or ill span it with 2 angle irons 10" or so above the height of the firebox.
 

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mason contractors
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after all I've preached about the notorious front vestal flange lip causing the slanted fireplace to smoke, you go and build a firebox with what looks like an 8'' front shelf,and merely 8'' above the lintel?? It cant even be plated now!
Dude how many L irons in front...looks like 12'' with spaces ..14''?

That wasnt needed, as the chamber an flue could easily have leaned the 12'' on 4'.
Furthermore your graduating from the Buckley school whom ridicules slants for doing just this,uses those rounded sectional throats.....a far better choice than what you did in that half slant half straight back firebox.

And 3 g non hacks place throat flashing at headers and intervals up tall exterior chimneys! Stops water and fire drafting in the air space...takes a little aluminum and minutes.

I highly advise in not a building firebox / throat chamber like this and you had to know I'd kringe in seeing it. Easy isnt always good! :whistling
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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Francis needs to take some pills, he is going to have a grabber right on the job site with his phone in his hand. LOL

I personally cannot understand this desperate need to place the fireplace structure adjacent to the building envelope. All the heat that is saturated into the structure from a typical fire is wasted to the outside. If you put the fireplace and chimney inside the building envelope, you get to capture and utilize all that stored heat.
Additionally the smoke on start up is less likely to be a problem because the chimney is warm up to the attic or eaves.
A lot of customers don't want to give up the footprint of the fireplace in their living space and I appreciate that. As a compromise, we can insulate an exterior unit pretty effectively if we plan for it. Then the mass of the whole fireplace becomes a thermal battery inside the living space instead of an ice block the size of an elephant sitting in the living room.
I find this design interesting and unlike others, I appreciate that it has a proven track record. My comments about location and insulation are just my observations (pet peeve)of how we build fireplaces to cool houses instead of heating them. I do not mean to be critical of the build, the craftsmanship is obvious.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Im not sure what you mean Francis, I fireflash every floor with roll flashing. There is just a single iron on the fireplace, a couple above in the throat above it.
 
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