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Sawdust follows Me Everywhere
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a back door to build for a client I already built a front entryway for. The existing door is a very odd size, 33"W x 72 3/8"T x 1 1/2"th. So no store bought door is gonna do it. The door is made from Spanish Cedar, which I hate because of the taste it imparts from the dust and oils, I call it puke wood. It has literally almost made me barf because of the gawd awful taste.

No pictures of the milling operations (Sorry Gus), just pcs and parts and the door glued up.


Here is the core of the door, it is assy for test fit


Here is the center stile showing the dowel hole and the front and rear panel


Here is the area where the lites will go, 3/4"th insulated glass


Here are the R&L stiles where I had to cut out the bead on the outside of the door, used a router and then carved the corners out w/a chisel


Here is the joint that the door uses. I don't have a cutter to do it in one pass, I have to flip the pc to get both sides done. The thickness becomes really critical. I was doing a pc so I could drill the dowel hole and it wouldn't fit, I measure the thickness and it was 0.006" thinner and that was enough to make it unfittable.


Here is everything ready to go, it is a lot of gluing to do and it needs to be done quick so things don't get stuck by the glue tacking up. It needs to be done neatly so the glue doesn't ooz into the panel area around the cope/bead joint.


Here the door is in clamps, the clamps look unbalanced but they are that way because that is what made the stiles and rails flat to one another. It is what it is - I'm not going to fight it.



I marked everything but the right and left stile. When I was in the rush to get everything fit and glued I grabbed the right stile and put it on the left side. I had to hammer it in which confused me, I just figured the glue swelled things a little and it needed some persuasion. Then I noticed one of my marks was out of alignment by a bit. I hit it good with the mallet and it didn't budge. That is when I realized it was the wrong side. I figured it was gone. I know how fast this glue tacks up. I got one of my mating blocks and gave the top horn a good wrap and it broke free. I couldn't believe it. It was only about 30-40 seconds of glue time, but that is all it can take with tight joinery. I had to clean up a lot of stuck wood, I was fretting that I would never get it together and clamped before the glue tacked up enough to freeze everything in place. But not to worry. I got the other stile on, it went on easy, like it should have. Got it in the clamps and let it sit for 1:30 hr. It is sanding up nice.


Door is now sanded, cut off the horns, broke all the edges. Now I have to bring it to the clients house to fit it in the opening which is no where near square, true or plumb. Should be an adventure.
 

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Sawdust follows Me Everywhere
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
After all that, you should threaten the client with mass mayhem if he doesn't have you true up the jambs to fit the door. :thumbsup:
We talked about putting a whole new jambset and full size door in there. The plusses and minuses about the job. He had the siding done just recently and a deck added on. Plus this is an 18th century home, so it is expected to be a little out. We just decided to use the original jamb and fit it. I priced it in.:whistling
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
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