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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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So the other day my uncle was asking me if I was interested in building an exterior door to replace this one, apparently the tenants dog is part beaver.

It doesn’t seem like it should be too crazy hard but I’m wondering if I’m missing something, especially on the weatherproofing/long term durability.

I haven’t thought through this is in too much detail but I figure I’ll trace the existing door onto a piece of plywood so I have a template, tear the existing door apart to get the glass unit out, build the new door out of 4 pieces of solid wood (maple?) with dadoes for the glass all joined together with tenons (maybe an excuse to finally get a domino?!). When I assemble it set the glass in a thick bead of Quad Max inside the dado and then a little bead of Quad Max on the outside where the wood meets the glass (the exterior is painted, the interior is stained) then just make sure to prime the top and bottom really good and put a sweep on the bottom. From the rough numbers he tossed out I know he knows it won’t be cheap but I think I can do it for a little less than it would cost to order a new door. There is a small porch providing some shelter to the door. What say the experts? Solid plan or am I biting off more than I realize here?

Thanks!
 

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IMO, buy a door, unless you just want to do it.

Quality of the lumber, grade, grain, moisture content will not be cheap.

I've done a few and ended up wishing i hadnt.

Dont recall the species but i used 8/4 lumber to start, and had a painter finish them.

A lot more work than meets the eye.

I'll bet Leo or Davis or another FOG will be along and say otherwise....

Good luck either way...
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Price vs you building it? Buy the door.

If you want to build it then you need to build it stable. The two side stiles are the critical elements. They need to be straight, they need to stay straight. It a tough call for wood. Most doors are made from engineered lumber. Small pcs put together and covered with a veneer. If one pc moves it doesn't affect the whole too much. With real wood if it moves it usually affects the entire length.

If you do go for it the stile is where you need the stability. For me making them takes a few days. It's to see what the board does. I get it in the rough and use my jointer to take as little off as possible and then plane it so it has two smooth sides. Let it sit for a day and see what it does. If it doesn't move you do it again taking even amounts off both sides with the planer. If it does move it needs to be straightened again with the jointer and then one pass in the planer.

You really need one straight side and the other can be off a bit, that will be the hinge side and will be held straight by the jamb. The other will be the strike side.
 

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This will take you near 25 hrs from initial look to install. Does that work for you ?

A builder lumber yard door shop with custom capabilities is your best bet. Maybe they can do it with proper joinery for < $1000. That door can be repaired looks like at the same yard.
 

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Artist and not a curator
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This will take you near 25 hrs from initial look to install. Does that work for you ?

A builder lumber yard door shop with custom capabilities is your best bet. Maybe they can do it with proper joinery for < $1000. That door can be repaired looks like at the same yard.
If that's his first door build it's going to be more than 25 hrs.

OP, you will **** it up at least once. I just did 9 doors and have enough parts for 2 more that are trashed. You should spend a while just culling lumber to get a grain that you can make straight as all get out.

Buying doors and custom building doors are starting to come more in line but I used to be about 5x a bought, special order door. I am now about 2x.

Thinking you can build that cheaper then you can buy it is way off. Since it's pine, I would certainly use engineered stiles and rails with a 1/4" veneered cover. You can buy the engineered stiles and rails prebuilt and you just mortise/tenon/fit them. That would be your best bet. Built a few last year that way and it is nice. If you use dominoes it has to be the 900 or whatever because the small dominoes aren't enough glue surface area to trust the joint on a door. Mortise and tennon is the way to go. Also, the glass should have cork or something as a spacer because the wood will expand and contract and tempered glass will go bang if it's pressured on it's sides. Ask me how I know.

The mortise should also have a slight angle towards outside and weep holes drilled so water can escape. Always assume it's not about "if" water gets in but "when" water gets in. With glass it has to have a place to escape.

And forget about using any glue other than titebond 3. When you have to glue, assemble, clamp, straighten, square, plus install glass, you need time before the glue skins or you're going to have a gap at the stile and rail and a compromised joint. It is a lot of fun but it's better when you are doing several, one can be a real pain in the ass.
 

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Always Learning
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Looks like an Andersen unit...be way cheaper and better to just order the replacement. Then it comes with a new warranty.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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I doubt it's warrantied against beaver dogs.... :ROFLMAO:
 

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There is a spray that dogs supposedly won't chew on because it taste so horrible to them. Never tried it.
 

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Artist and not a curator
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Mine aren't too prone to chewing on stuff so I'm lucky. My boxer, if he got left alone without his guy, he lost his **** and chewed on everything.

If he thought we tried to get him to not chew on something by making it taste bad he would double up on said thing just to show he wouldn't be swayed. Miss that ole boy. I'd replace a thousand doors to have him back.
 

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I'm lucky. Cleo hasn't chewed on one single thing that wasn't given to her to chew on.
When I first got her and took her to the vet, she asked what my intentions were during the day. I told her she was coming with me in the truck all day.
She said you are going to regret that. I asked why and she said she would probably destroy the interior.
Nope...never...not a thing. Not a slipper, shoe, extension cord...nada.
 

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I once replaced 9 doors in a house that the customers Akita ate, completely gone from the knob down. Ate into the garage, half the door, trim and 2 studs, and was starting on the garage door.

Lady never should have had a dog she worked from 530 am to 930 pm 5 days a week
 

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Looks like it has a mortised lock, type used for patio doors. If you don’t have the tooling to do that correctly you might want to buy the door. If it locks top and bottom they can be a bear.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks everybody, lots of good advice here. I took a quick look around and it looks like I can buy a slab a lot cheaper than I was thinking so I am leaning toward that option now. I’m about to leave for some camping out past the end of cell coverage so I’ll have to circle back to this in a week or so.
 
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