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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New hear, Bryant split sys central air condenser mtr is running 22 amps is that a little high? mode# 561cj042-e Thanks
 

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New hear, Bryant split sys central air condenser mtr is running 22 amps is that a little high? mode# 561cj042-e Thanks
What are the outdoor and indoor temps?
What are the operating pressures and temps, SH and SC
What is the RLA rated load amps of the compressor?
is that the amp draw of the compressor or the whole condensing unit?
Have you checked your capacitor?

need more info
 

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NICKTECH
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if your not sure about one of the most basic diagnostic proceedures for a motor than i think you in the wrong biz, if your even in it in the first place.
 

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Superheat,
Never mind the rude people here, welcome to the forum.
As far as the amp readings, look at the rating plates and consider that you may be getting the draw for the compressor where you are at. Isolate the compressor and fan to see what they are doing independently.
Larry
 

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Superheat,
Never mind the rude people here, welcome to the forum.
As far as the amp readings, look at the rating plates and consider that you may be getting the draw for the compressor where you are at. Isolate the compressor and fan to see what they are doing independently. For a larger Bryant in a residential application, this might be realistic.
Larry
 

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NICKTECH
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Superheat,
Never mind the rude people here, welcome to the forum.
As far as the amp readings, look at the rating plates and consider that you may be getting the draw for the compressor where you are at. Isolate the compressor and fan to see what they are doing independently. For a larger Bryant in a residential application, this might be realistic.
Larry
sorry, not trying to be rude, i'll be the first one to help someone in need HO or not, but if one is untrained and doesnt know the rudimentary basics, playing with electricity and amperage is deadly and irresponsible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bryant Amps NickTech

My experience is with 600 V DC motors driving carrier comp that pull 35 amps for 10 ton train air conditioning systems. Off the top of my head the RMS value of 22 amps AC is 14.8 amps DC this is just under 1/2 the amp draw of 10 Tons I Dont know what the capacity of this unit is i was hoping the Model number could shed some light 561cj042-e Which was in my 1st post. So my question is, is 22 amps ac a little high? My amp clamp shows between 20.7 and 22 and it floats up and down between these two numbers as the unit runs.

When i First looked at this unit it was not running L1 on the direct purpose contacter was loose subsquently the area was burnt, L1 wire was burnt about 2 inches of insulation was melted off the wire and you can see the copper wire took heat. Both have been replaced.
 

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that's too high, even for a 561j060. Overcharge is first thought. Other than that, deeper investigation is needed. This should be a 10 SEER unit. Have installed & sevice many similiar units. Former Bryant dealer now Carrier due to their territory markings but model # familiar from past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
gene 2

Thanks, will do what should the range be?

that's too high, even for a 561j060. Overcharge is first thought. Other than that, deeper investigation is needed. This should be a 10 SEER unit. Have installed & sevice many similiar units. Former Bryant dealer now Carrier due to their territory markings but model # familiar from past.
 

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NICKTECH
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New hear, Bryant split sys central air condenser mtr is running 22 amps is that a little high? mode# 561cj042-e Thanks
the 42 in the model # says its a 3.5 ton and a quick google says its a 10 seer.
http://www.furnacecompare.com/air-conditioners/bryant/561CJ042-E.html
the motor itself will give you the amps that the motor should be running on. if the motor is illegible then use total amps from the unit, and subtract the fla of the compressor. pretty simple stuff. true RMS reading and all that about DC motors is completely irrelevent. common sense rules the battle field (or in this case the troubleshooting.):thumbup:
 

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You didn't specify the service the system is running on. On an apartment complex and multi-family dwellings, many are given 208v from 208Y/120v system and the amps will be approximately inversely proportionally higher compared to 120/240 split-phase system.
 
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