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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello eveyone. At the company I work for I generally do finish carpentry and kitchen installations. Lately though I've been doing more finishing and painting. I feel like I'm a pretty competent painter and I have experience at finishing from my previous job at a cabinet shop. I'm currently painting some built-ins and I'm having trouble with brush marks. I'm using SW Pro Mar 200 semi-gloss with floetrol. I feel like I'm loading the brush with enough paint and I only brush enough to spread my paint and then tip it off. Am I expecting too much to expect no brush marks?
 

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You should start by switching paints. If you want SW switch to Pro Classic. Use a softer brush. It also matters what you're painting over, is it primed or previously painted?

You can get a much smoother finish with oil base. But it can be done with the right water base paint, brush and substrate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It was primed with SW primer. The primer wasn't tinted though. One coat primer, then sanded, then two topcoats on the interiors and three topcoats on the faceframes and the countertops, all sanded in between coats with a fine 3M sanding sponge. As an experiment I took a piece of the same plywood and sanded it and just put paint with no primer on it and it looked like it laid down smoother than the primed parts.
 

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What type of wood is it? The primer will raise the grain and on some woods it takes a lot to get it sanded smooth, I personally don't like sanding sponges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Its all poplar and poplar plywood. I personally am not crazy about the sponges either, but the different sandpapers I tried(180,220,320) all clogged so fast I would've gone through a whole pack per built-in and the sponge didn't load up like that.
 

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Its all poplar and poplar plywood. I personally am not crazy about the sponges either, but the different sandpapers I tried(180,220,320) all clogged so fast I would've gone through a whole pack per built-in and the sponge didn't load up like that.
If it was loading like that it may not have been dry enough when sanded. An oil based primer needs 24 hours for example.
 

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Ya if the sandpaper is loading up the primer isn't dry enough. There's different kinds of brushes, Purdy doesn't tell me anything other than they are junk since SW bought them out.

What primer exactly is it? If it didn't dry properly that could be your main issue.
 

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I use the norton 3x sandpaper. Clogs a lot less than other brands. Also I don't know about SW but I use BM products and floetrol is no longer compatible with them. Especially the waterbornes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ya if the sandpaper is loading up the primer isn't dry enough. There's different kinds of brushes, Purdy doesn't tell me anything other than they are junk since SW bought them out.

What primer exactly is it? If it didn't dry properly that could be your main issue.
The primer sanded ok, no loading. It was the top coats that were loading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ya if the sandpaper is loading up the primer isn't dry enough. There's different kinds of brushes, Purdy doesn't tell me anything other than they are junk since SW bought them out.

What primer exactly is it? If it didn't dry properly that could be your main issue.
I can't remember off the top of my head which purdy brush it is. What kind of brush would you recommend?
 

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I can't remember off the top of my head which purdy brush it is. What kind of brush would you recommend?
I could recommend the most expensive brush made but I don't think that's your issue. If the paint is gumming up when sanding then it's not dry enough. If I'm concerned with brush marks I'll wait till the following day and that's just to recoat not sand.

I never use Floetrol maybe it's not compatible or you're using too much and slowing the drying process. As I said in my first post Pro Mar isn't what I would use for any woodwork and certainly not cabinetry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I could recommend the most expensive brush made but I don't think that's your issue. If the paint is gumming up when sanding then it's not dry enough. If I'm concerned with brush marks I'll wait till the following day and that's just to recoat not sand.

I never use Floetrol maybe it's not compatible or you're using too much and slowing the drying process. As I said in my first post Pro Mar isn't what I would use for any woodwork and certainly not cabinetry.
Up to this point the paint has always been on the job by the time we get there, but I think I need to be more involved in paint selection for cabinetry. Thanks for the info about the paint we are currently using.
 

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By the way...once you open a container of Floetrol, the clock starts ticking. It has a lousy short shelf life once opened and will coagulate like crazy after about 3 months. Nothing like opening the cap on a used Floetrol container, pouring it into the paint and seeing coagulated crap pour out. There ARE other latex extenders that don't coagulate once opened. My local Southern Calif. paint company (Frazee) came out with their own latex enamel paint extender. It had an indefinite shelf life once opened. So...use up Floetrol fairly quickly, it doesn't store well once opened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
By the way...once you open a container of Floetrol, the clock starts ticking. It has a lousy short shelf life once opened and will coagulate like crazy after about 3 months. Nothing like opening the cap on a used Floetrol container, pouring it into the paint and seeing coagulated crap pour out. There ARE other latex extenders that don't coagulate once opened. My local Southern Calif. paint company (Frazee) came out with their own latex enamel paint extender. It had an indefinite shelf life once opened. So...use up Floetrol fairly quickly, it doesn't store well once opened.
Wow did not know that.
 
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