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correct...it isn't possible with the supplied information... one angle, one altitude or one measurement from corner to opposing corner and it can be determined. Even trig cannot determine the area without an acute angle or radian dimmension.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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correct...it isn't possible with the supplied information... one angle, one altitude or one measurement from corner to opposing corner and it can be determined. Even trig cannot determine the area without an acute angle or radian dimmension.
So draw it to scale and measure it! There is indeed enough information, if you just step outside of the textbook and work in the real world. With the info that is provided, the angles, altitudes and missing measurements can all be either measured or calculated.

I'd do it, but (a) I'd have to hit the books, because it's been too long, and (b) I got rained off a roof today, and I'm by golly relaxing tonight.
 

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yes i could copy it and paste in in one of several application I have but that doesnt mean that the original poster drew it as it actually exists in his job. So what's the point?
 

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yes i could copy it and paste in in one of several application I have but that doesnt mean that the original poster drew it as it actually exists in his job. So what's the point?
Copy and paste won't do it. His drawing is no where near to scale.
 

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Eater of sins.
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If you look at the 14' line that I drew you wil notice that the start and the end of the line can go in a infinite number of positions along the two arcs that represent all the possibilities that the 25' and 30' lines can reside on.
Changing (ever so slightly) the total area that can be calculated.
We need at least one angle to be able to calculate the "true" area.

Andy.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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DOH! Bunch o' rocket surgeons...

The area of any shape is encompassed by its perimeter, right?

The perimeter of this shape is 73'.

Pi * Diameter = Circumference. Circumference/Pi=Diameter.

73/3.14159=23.2366

Radius=23.2366/2=11.6183

Area of a circle = Pi * R squared

Area = 3.14159 * 134.9848 = 424.0668

:smartass:

Check the math, because I'm crosseyed tired and oughta be in bed, but the concept is right on. :thumbsup:
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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DOH! Bunch o' rocket surgeons...

The area of any shape is encompassed by its perimeter, right?

The perimeter of this shape is 73'.

Pi * Diameter = Circumference. Circumference/Pi=Diameter.

73/3.14159=23.2366

Radius=23.2366/2=11.6183

Area of a circle = Pi * R squared

Area = 3.14159 * 134.9848 = 424.0668

:smartass:

Check the math, because I'm crosseyed tired and oughta be in bed, but the concept is right on. :thumbsup:
That might be true... if it were a circle... :no:
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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If you look at the 14' line that I drew you wil notice that the start and the end of the line can go in a infinite number of positions along the two arcs that represent all the possibilities that the 25' and 30' lines can reside on..
It doesn't matter. See my post before this one. :thumbsup:
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Tie a piece of string into a loop. Shape that loop into a square, a triangle, or any polygonal shape you want. The area contained by the perimeter will still be the same. :thumbsup:
Oh so wrong grasshopper.


If you take your 73' and divide by 4 and make a square 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 you will have an area of 333 1/16 SF. Now if you take that same string and make a rectangle of 1' x 35.5' (1+1+35.5+35.5=73) you have an area of 35 1/2 SF.

Try again.:shifty:
 

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Eater of sins.
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Tie a piece of string into a loop. Shape that loop into a square, a triangle, or any polygonal shape you want. The area contained by the perimeter will still be the same. :thumbsup:
Actually the overall LENGTH of the string will remain constant, the area described by the string will change. Consider this...If you have a perfect circle with the string then change it to an elliptical shape the area is smaller than that of the circle.

Can't come up with a better example than that.

And I am not a rocket scientist.

Andy.
 

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Tie a piece of string into a loop. Shape that loop into a square, a triangle, or any polygonal shape you want. The area contained by the perimeter will still be the same. :thumbsup:
No, it won't. If you were to push one corner so it almost touches the opposite corner, the area that is contained will become less and less.
 

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General Contractor
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Well, I'm getting 233.3809, but that's just guessing at the angles.

It doesn't take much shifting to make it read 227. something.

(This is using AutoCAD "poly" properties)
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Well, it made all kinds of sense last night. :drink: :blush:

Fortunately, I never order concrete on a Saturday night. :laughing:
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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If this is formed up out there in the real world, all one needs to do is measure one diagonal and report back to the brain squad.

It's Sunday and I have no shoes on, the abacus is ready.
 
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