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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made a new clamping bench today. I think it might be of interest to some of you.

The main purpose for this bench is to clamp frames onto boxes. The big advantage it has over using saw horses is that the 3/4" parts are all vertical so there is not much in the way of the clamps.
Plus when you don't need it, it breaks down and stands in the corner somewhere.

As you can see the four parts just interlock with one and other. The narrow setting works well for base cabinets and the wider one is nice for uppers. But the two distances are nice to have for all the stange size stuff too.

The picture with the clamps is the original that I made years ago with a skill saw. The boys want to pitch it and make another new one. I say use it, no sense in getting carried away with the cnc. Ya think?







 

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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
:thumbsup: Pretty nice Gus. How far down do you take that spoil board ? I always had vac problems when I would run down that far.
It has seen it's last fly cut. But about a 1/4" is about the limit.

I start with half inch, fly cut both sides a couple times.
Oh yeah, thinned out glue on the edges so we don't lose anything there.

I find the thinner it is the better the suction. Just that when it gets real thin it curls and moves around alot in between sheets.
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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1,985 Posts
It has seen it's last fly cut. But about a 1/4" is about the limit.

I start with half inch, fly cut both sides a couple times.
Oh yeah, thinned out glue on the edges so we don't lose anything there.

I find the thinner it is the better the suction. Just that when it gets real thin it curls and moves around alot in between sheets.
I feel like I'm at an Art Film festival, watching a movie in Russian, with Japanese subtitles.:blink:
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I feel like I'm at an Art Film festival, watching a movie in Russian, with Japanese subtitles.:blink:
Let me slow it down for you Bass.

The spoils board is that thin sheet of mdf under that work piece.

The vacuum pumps suck through the spoils board to "clamp" the work piece to the deck during machining.

Every part that is out lined, the cutter enters the spoils board by .008 inches leaving a maze of little dados all over the spoils board.

Eventually you begin to lose suction because the surface has been compromised too much.

So enter the "Fly Cutter". It is a 3 toothed 3" diameter planer. We run a program that grabs that cutter and skims .010 inches off the top of the spoils board. All new again.

Reset the tools to the new elevation and you are good to go again.

Eventually the spoils board needs to be replaced.

MDF is denser on the face than the center so I fly cut the new spoils board twice to remove the densest material, flip it over and do the same thing. Then the board breaths better and holds the small parts much better.

Cool stuff
 

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Box Builder
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6,320 Posts
Don't get carried away with the cnc? Why not? You could spend all week making jigs with that thing. Nice table. for those really big cabinets I might add a third leg so there is more bearing surface to rest the cabinet's weight on.
 

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Registered
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1,154 Posts
Personally I don't see getting rid of something still usefull:thumbsup:

Nice design. Simple, easy to break down, allows for variations.:thumbup:
 

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Moderator
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4,617 Posts
The picture with the clamps is the original that I made years ago with a skill saw. The boys want to pitch it and make another new one. I say use it, no sense in getting carried away with the cnc. Ya think?
I think you've been sniffin the vacuum too much. :w00t:

Let 'em have fun, sheesh.
 
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