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Always 18 gauge for us. And I try to fire through the trim and hit the bottom plate of the wall to help pin everything together nice and tight.

Although it occurs to me that if you ever wanted to put new flooring in, it would be nice to be able to just pop off the shoe instead of the whole trim. And that would be easier if it were just tacked down independently.
 

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I wouldn't say it's necessarily wrong, but myself, - - I only use pins in when it's in conjunction with glue. In other words, I'm only using the pins to hold something long enough for the glue to set . . .
 

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I wouldn't say it's necessarily wrong, but myself, - - I only use pins in when it's in conjunction with glue. In other words, I'm only using the pins to hold something long enough for the glue to set . . .
Yup, I do that elsewhere.

As for the shoe, I just keep the fasteners a little bit long. Basically, I got hooked after doing some prefinished stuff on some tight budget jobs. Not that it makes it right, but anyway... Now I'm attached to this new habit...we'll see.
 

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If it's a true shoe 1/2" thick max, I use a 23 gauge 1-3/8" pin.

If it's actually quarter round, I use 18 gauge, 1-9/16" brad. But I try to avoid using quarter round in lieu of shoe. It just ain't right. Given a choice, I'd rather use a modified stop for that application than quarter round.
 

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I've been debating on getting a pinner, had wondered how many guys use them for shoe. I don't do much that I need a pinner for but I'm always looking for an excuse for a new tool.
For me, it was kind of like when I debated to get a multi-master. Once I got it, I wondered what took me so long and learned that maybe I didn't have the imagination I thought I did. Great tool.:thumbup:
 

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Just an informational post for you guys;

Shoe mould's main purpose is to cove the joint between the bottom of the baseboard and the flooring.

That joint will move some with seasonal moisture. Especially with ballon framing.

For this reason, shoe should (in the traditional fashion) should be secured NOT to the baseboard but diagonally into the sub floor. This will allow the base to move behind the shoe and the shoe will stay tight to the floor.

Bob
 

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Just an informational post for you guys;

Shoe mould's main purpose is to cove the joint between the bottom of the baseboard and the flooring.

That joint will move some with seasonal moisture. Especially with ballon framing.

For this reason, shoe should (in the traditional fashion) should be secured NOT to the baseboard but diagonally into the sub floor. This will allow the base to move behind the shoe and the shoe will stay tight to the floor.

Bob
This can depend on what flooring is going down if it is a engineered/laminate floating floor, or around cabinet and island kickers and for newer home securing it to the vertical material behind is better.

http://shiptonconstruction.com
 

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Brian2014 said:
This can depend on what flooring is going down if it is a engineered/laminate floating floor, or around cabinet and island kickers and for newer home securing it to the vertical material behind is better.

http://shiptonconstruction.com
As long as you are aware that attaching to the base does not allow shoe to remain covering the base/floor joint with seasonal movement. Flooring material makes no difference.
 

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As long as you are aware that attaching to the base does not allow shoe to remain covering the base/floor joint with seasonal movement. Flooring material makes no difference.
Seasonal movement in really old homes that were build under different codes maybe. Today the floor trusses are engineered. The only lift is from roof trusses that can make interior walls raise and that does not happen to often. I guess here in Calgary we never get those problems because houses are not over a 100 years.

Basement floors are a different story all together...:thumbsup:

With todays new floating floors its just a NO NO to nail into them.;)

http://shiptonconstruction.com
 
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