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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will a BR30 work in a 4" can? Any trim ring suggestions?

I bought some BR30 LED bulbs but need to find a trim ring that is compatible, if it is even possible????
 

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A BR 30 is 3-3/4" in diameter (the 30 means 30 -1/8's of an inch so 30x1/8= 3-3/4"). Not going to work. I'd be surprised if you can get it to fit in the housing.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A BR 30 is 3-3/4" in diameter (the 30 means 30 -1/8's of an inch so 30x1/8= 3-3/4"). Not going to work. I'd be surprised if you can get it to fit in the housing.

Tom
It fits in the housing and will even screw part way in with the trim ring. Just not all the way. O well. I'll put them somewhere else and get some different bulbs.

I guess the BR30 must be made for more of a 5" can application. I seems to small in diameter for a 6" can.

Thanks Tom
 

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It fits in the housing and will even screw part way in with the trim ring. Just not all the way. O well. I'll put them somewhere else and get some different bulbs.

I guess the BR30 must be made for more of a 5" can application. I seems to small in diameter for a 6" can.

Thanks Tom
The bulb that a can uses is determined by the trim. Most cans have a label that lists the bulb/trim combination.

The most common trim for a 4" uses a 20 (2.5") bulb.

Tom
 

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It should screw in but the trim won't fit, plus those LED lights need to vent heat or else they die really fast, putting a big bulb in a tight can is a bad idea.

Take a look at the Phillips par20 bulbs, they have great venting and one of the best dimming spectrums I've ever see in an LED drop in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Inner10 said:
It should screw in but the trim won't fit, plus those LED lights need to vent heat or else they die really fast, putting a big bulb in a tight can is a bad idea.

Take a look at the Phillips par20 bulbs, they have great venting and one of the best dimming spectrums I've ever see in an LED drop in.
Thanks for the advice Inner. I'm putting the finishing touches on my house trying to use LEDs where I can. I hate cfls. Dropped some serious coin to outfit 35 cans with LEDs but they will pay for themselves in time.

I'll give that bulb a try. What brand/model would you recommend for standard old bulbs. Say a 60 or 75 watt equivilant?

Also do you have a favorite led dimmer?
 

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A 9 watt LED is equivalent to a 50 watt incandescent.

If you like the light of an incandescent you'll want a 2700k bulb. I like the 5000k light, it is closer to natural light.

If you want to use dimmers, make sure the bulb is designed to dim, also check the dimmer.

Tom
 

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Thanks for the advice Inner. I'm putting the finishing touches on my house trying to use LEDs where I can. I hate cfls. Dropped some serious coin to outfit 35 cans with LEDs but they will pay for themselves in time.

I'll give that bulb a try. What brand/model would you recommend for standard old bulbs. Say a 60 or 75 watt equivilant?

Also do you have a favorite led dimmer?
Phillips 3000k are my go to because they dim so nice, some people prefer the 2700k though. Phillips has a few A shape bulbs you can try but I don't have any experience with them as I pretty much only use Par20 MR16 and GU10s.

As for dimmers do you have a neutral in the box?

If no: MACL‑153M

If yes: MAELV-600

If you don't have a neutral certain brands of bulbs on circuits with only a light or two may flicker or not have a smooth linear dimming spectrum.

In all honesty I don't think @ $25 a bulb + added cost for ELV dimmers you will be saving a heck of a lot....I still use mostly incandescent in my house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Phillips 3000k are my go to because they dim so nice, some people prefer the 2700k though. Phillips has a few A shape bulbs you can try but I don't have any experience with them as I pretty much only use Par20 MR16 and GU10s.

As for dimmers do you have a neutral in the box?

If no: MACL‑153M

If yes: MAELV-600

If you don't have a neutral certain brands of bulbs on circuits with only a light or two may flicker or not have a smooth linear dimming spectrum.

In all honesty I don't think @ $25 a bulb + added cost for ELV dimmers you will be saving a heck of a lot....I still use mostly incandescent in my house.
One of the big reasons I went LED was heat. I have 22 6" cans in my kitchen and 9 - 6" in my living room. With a 9 foot ceiling I was thinking I might be cooking with that much incandescent heat. CFL would have been ok but their many flaws annoy me. I wanted to be able to dim. I would rather invest upfront when I know I've got the cash and know my electric bill is going to be lower in the future if the wallet gets tight. Plus I really like the look of the LED retrofit kits. Really helps with the swiss cheese effect IMO.

I tried two different Lutron Diva's. One I got by accident thinking it was for led's. It was for incandescent/halogen but works fine. Actually better than the one made for LED/CFL. The 600 watt dimmer has a slight delay the first time you flip the switch if it has been off for a while. The LED version has a 1 second delay every time you flip the switch.

The incandescent model has a build in light but I'm wondering if that pulls enough to defeat the purpose of the whole energy efficiency thing?

I will look into those dimmers you recommended. What do you mean when you say neutral? This are going on a three way. So where I have them I have two blacks, a red, and ground going on the switch, the white neutrals are together????
 

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One of the big reasons I went LED was heat. I have 22 6" cans in my kitchen and 9 - 6" in my living room. With a 9 foot ceiling I was thinking I might be cooking with that much incandescent heat. CFL would have been ok but their many flaws annoy me. I wanted to be able to dim. I would rather invest upfront when I know I've got the cash and know my electric bill is going to be lower in the future if the wallet gets tight. Plus I really like the look of the LED retrofit kits. Really helps with the swiss cheese effect IMO.

I tried two different Lutron Diva's. One I got by accident thinking it was for led's. It was for incandescent/halogen but works fine. Actually better than the one made for LED/CFL. The 600 watt dimmer has a slight delay the first time you flip the switch if it has been off for a while. The LED version has a 1 second delay every time you flip the switch.

The incandescent model has a build in light but I'm wondering if that pulls enough to defeat the purpose of the whole energy efficiency thing?

I will look into those dimmers you recommended. What do you mean when you say neutral? This are going on a three way. So where I have them I have two blacks, a red, and ground going on the switch, the white neutrals are together????
In ON our heating season is so long that I don't really care about the excess heat, that just helps heat my house in the winter.

Electronic fade dimmers work as such:

A two wire dimmer doesn't actually turn off, it uses paracitic power and lets electricity leach through it when it's in the off position. With small LED/CFL loads sometimes this won't cause them to turn off, they will have a slight flicker. That's why they all have an airgap that you pull to cut the power for them to be UL/ULC/CSA.

A neutral dimmer can completely shut off the power from the load side because the mechanism is powered through the line-neutral path. To install one of these you would have to pigtail off the neutrals that a nutted up in the box.

In the case of a switch loop where the power is at the fixture you can find yourself kinda boned on installation day. :laughing:
 
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I should add that the first step in an energy efficient home is to either install occupancy sensors for lights or teach your girlfriend/wife to turn off the damn lights when she leaves the room.
 
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I have 57 can lights in my home and went to all LED. My electric bill was substantially lower. However not knowing a lot about it I just bought the ones at costco.



Compact fluorescent lamp Lighting Light bulb

I think they were 15 bucks a pop. Says they will last 22.5 years.
 

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I have 57 can lights in my home and went to all LED. My electric bill was substantially lower. However not knowing a lot about it I just bought the ones at costco.



View attachment 100678

I think they were 15 bucks a pop. Says they will last 22.5 years.
Feit are good, but don't dim as nice as Phillips, I'd put them on par with Sylvania.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have 57 can lights in my home and went to all LED. My electric bill was substantially lower. However not knowing a lot about it I just bought the ones at costco.



View attachment 100678

I think they were 15 bucks a pop. Says they will last 22.5 years.
I put these in. LED retrofit from Lowes. Utilitech 6".



I called ahead to have them pull them in advance to find there was two different sized boxes with the same model number. Thought "whatever" and took them home. Started installing to find out that the narrower box is a huge improvement in installation and function over the older model. Took the big boxes back and swapped them out for the new ones. Very pleased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
In ON our heating season is so long that I don't really care about the excess heat, that just helps heat my house in the winter.

Electronic fade dimmers work as such:

A two wire dimmer doesn't actually turn off, it uses paracitic power and lets electricity leach through it when it's in the off position. With small LED/CFL loads sometimes this won't cause them to turn off, they will have a slight flicker. That's why they all have an airgap that you pull to cut the power for them to be UL/ULC/CSA.

A neutral dimmer can completely shut off the power from the load side because the mechanism is powered through the line-neutral path. To install one of these you would have to pigtail off the neutrals that a nutted up in the box.

In the case of a switch loop where the power is at the fixture you can find yourself kinda boned on installation day. :laughing:
It looks like the first dimmer you mentioned requires you to rewire the 2nd 3-way at the other box. That would be a huge PIA as I've already got a crap ton of wires to deal with.

Do you know if there is a danger to the bulbs or to the dimmer from using the lutron dimmer that is rated at 600 watt for incandescent/halogen? The one I've got installed is working great but i don't really want to burn my house down or trash my very expensive lights????
 

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Spencer said:
It looks like the first dimmer you mentioned requires you to rewire the 2nd 3-way at the other box. That would be a huge PIA as I've already got a crap ton of wires to deal with. Do you know if there is a danger to the bulbs or to the dimmer from using the lutron dimmer that is rated at 600 watt for incandescent/halogen? The one I've got installed is working great but i don't really want to burn my house down or trash my very expensive lights????

I tried those lights first, but they were to long for the shallow cans I used for a 2x8 deep joist. I think their only made to fit certain depts. they are nice though. I like the color light they put out. :thumbsup:

These lights here, that you were talking about

White Ceiling Technology Electronic device Illustration
 

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It looks like the first dimmer you mentioned requires you to rewire the 2nd 3-way at the other box. That would be a huge PIA as I've already got a crap ton of wires to deal with.

Do you know if there is a danger to the bulbs or to the dimmer from using the lutron dimmer that is rated at 600 watt for incandescent/halogen? The one I've got installed is working great but i don't really want to burn my house down or trash my very expensive lights????
It's not a huge pain, that's standard practice for electronic 3-way dimmers.

600W is the max load, most have an optional 1000W version if you have a larger load. You probably won't even come close to the 600w limit.
 

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Inner10 said:
It's not a huge pain, that's standard practice for electronic 3-way dimmers. 600W is the max load, most have an optional 1000W version if you have a larger load. You probably won't even come close to the 600w limit.
Isn't the heat created by thoses dimmers something to think about, especially putting too many in one box?
 

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Isn't the heat created by thoses dimmers something to think about, especially putting too many in one box?
You rarely come close to max with led lights. If they are 1000w tabbed dimmers they typically derate by 200w each side you snap off. Many of the new lutron electronic dimmers don't use tabs or derate.
 
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