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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently purchased a Geoblaster GB400. Getting it set up on a trailer with a Sullair 185 to be mobile and I'm about done with that. Last item to get is water tanks and I will know which ones tomorrow. I have done a ton of reading on here and have learned a lot.

Went to Chicago and picked up 3 super sacks of glass from NABM, two 40/70 and one 20/40. That was an experience....picked it up where it's actually recycled. Cardboard and plastic bales stacked high along with piles of glass...which is where they told me park the truck and trailer, right next to the glass piles!! That didn't seem like a very smart thing to do but they said I'd be OK. So far all 8 tires are good.

I have been doing some small jobs at my house (live in the country) and learning how to run the GB. Trying different pressures and abrasives. I've done thin sheet metal hot water baseboard register covers. Went with 30 psi and 40/70 on that and all seemed good. Did a hidden 5th wheel hitch for a pick up. Upped the pressure to 50 psi with the leftover 40/70, worked so so. It has what I was told is pack rust in some spots. Today I went with 80 psi and 20/40 on the hitch and rust and it worked good. Also did 4 wheels with the 40/70 and 80 psi. That went good.

So here's where I wonder if you guys could could give me some advice.

My nozzled locked up about 3 threads into the nozzle holder, both aluminum. Put it on by hand and couldn't move it without two large pipe wrenches. Split the nozzle holder to get the nozzle out and was able to have the threads cleaned up on the nozzle to save it. So I bought a quick connect nylon nozzle holder along with a nylon coupling for the hose end from Marco. Put the coupling on the hose and read later on that there is some sort of sealant for that connection. Is that correct? Put the rest of it together and went to put in the nozzle washer and it had a smaller opening than the nozzle does, so I left it out. Didn't make sense to put in a smaller opening with the washer to possibly restrict flow. Fired it up and it leaked for a second out of the coupling back towards me and then stopped leaking. Ran a few more parts and then did some more reading and decided to put the nozzle washer back in. It leaked worse than before and didn't quit. What am I doing wrong? Is this because I didn't use the sealer when I assembled it all?

I'm still trying to figure out the psi I should use as a rule of thumb to start. Any suggestions?

My deadman is to far back from the nozzle as far as I'm concerned. Where is it supposed to actually be in relation to the nozzle?

The lines that run to the deadman are duct taped to the hose. Is that how everyone does it or is there a better way?

Found out that I need whipchecks too. Anything that I need to know about them?

That should do it for now. Thanks for any suggestions you might have.
Thanks,
Steve
 

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I personally do not like whip checks, I use them, but in addition to rope also. Properly tied off connections with rope are 100 times safer than just whips checks. Having seen many bull hoses blow apart the rope held it perfect, the whip check is just the backup, having witnessed them blow with only a whip check and not tied off, that's not fun, and have scars from it still. Tie them off, and use whip checks to be safe.
 

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i've always used Clemco hoses and fittings, nozzles are "contractor thread". never had a problem, just tighten it by hand and you are good to go. no leaks, no problem. you can undo them by hand or sometimes with a small plier.
tipically you don't need any seals, you cut the hose, fit it in the nozzle holder firmly, put the screws in and just put the nozzle in.

PSI: it depends on the job and media used. i don't hesitate with industrial and heavy rust stuff... i go full 120 PSI

Deadman: should be right by the nozzle, some guys prefer to have the deadman a little far back to hold it with one hand and the other hand on the nozzle or the nozzle holder. i prefer to have it right by the nozzle.

Deadman lines: its OK to have them duct taped, zip ties will damage the hose after long periods of time, duct tape looks a little "half-ass", but it will keep your hose in good condition.

Whip checks are a MUST, especially on the blast hoses, it's a mess when they come apart, as Matt83 said, rope or baling wire is always good too !
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys.

Matt I don't know what properly tied off with rope would look like. What size and type of rope? Are there any pictures out there you can point me to?

RoKa my new nylon fittings are Clemco parts. I'll pull the nozzle holder apart and look it over and see if I did something wrong. I have a couple of days of painting to do so I'll reposition my deadman closer to the nozzle. Where it is now is not user friendly for me and makes me work harder at holding it down and maintaining control of the nozzle.

Thanks again
 

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Glen
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I actually took Dyer's advice and went with electricians tape for my lines. I won't leave all kinds of residue and it stretches easy to make things tight. I tend to like the dead man about six inches back and I keep it loose so I can twist it when the hose twists. I do choke it up when I have to blast with one hand while holding a light. No wrong way. If you get blow back it might be that you didn't cut the hoes straight enough. I do well with a hack saw but I have also used a Stanley blade. There are cutter tools for it you want to spend the cash on it. I have never used a sealer. I think your threads may have had grit in them when you tightened your nozzle. That could have locked them up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Betterblast

The hose is factory new, no cutting by me. It looked like a nice square cut. I'll pull it apart and make sure I get the nozzle holder down square against the hose. Maybe I didn't get it tight enough against the nozzle holder....

My deadman has 2 big heavy duty tie wraps holding it to the hose. They are in a groove on either end of it. I like the idea of being able to let it turn when the hose decides to turn. Do you use tie wraps to hold the deadman?

I'm pretty sure it was grit that got me on the nozzle. I screwed it in a few threads and it stopped. Took it out and blew everything out and tried it again and it locked tight. That's why I went with a nylon nozzle holder, figured it was more forgiving.
 

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Todd
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I have used a hack saw in the past and never had an issue until recently..I went through a few connectors as the hose wasn't cut dead nuts square... Wastes time and money when they blow out the side. I purchased a chop saw and now have no more issues.
I also have been using cable ties on my hoses and have had the inside of the hose wear what I would call normal. I do understand the philosophy of the the tape and may try it on my next hose I build.
As far as the the locked up nozzle/ holder. It had to be either a cross thread starting or a bit of grit in there. I just lost a cheaper clemco nozzle with the plastic threads due to a cross thread and the nozzle was almost new. From now on its only kenemetal nozzles with the brass threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a Kennametal aluminum nozzle with the fine 1.25" threads. I might look into the contractor threads on the next nozzle.
 

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Thanks guys.

Matt I don't know what properly tied off with rope would look like. What size and type of rope? Are there any pictures out there you can point me to?

RoKa my new nylon fittings are Clemco parts. I'll pull the nozzle holder apart and look it over and see if I did something wrong. I have a couple of days of painting to do so I'll reposition my deadman closer to the nozzle. Where it is now is not user friendly for me and makes me work harder at holding it down and maintaining control of the nozzle.

Thanks again
Clove hitch 2' back from fitting, then half hitch at fitting, same on the otherside. I tie off all hoses that way. CP hose 1/4" rope, bullwips or 2", 1/2" rope. Attached is a picture of 2.5" hose tied off with threaded connections, threaded connections usually blow apart just beyond the crimped fitting, usually a inch or so back. Whip checks never catch them and they just keep sailing away. Tied off always stay in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have gone back to an aluminum nozzle holder. The nylon quick connect set up I went to after breaking the aluminum nozzle holder I couldn't really ever get it to seal. If I tightened the hose tight against the nylon holder it pushed the gasket out too far to get the quick connect nylon nozzle holder to lock into place when I rotated it. Put a new aluminum nozzle holder on the hose and it butts up tight against the shoulder inside the nozzle holder. I have not tried it yet since installing it but will this weekend.

I will try the lithium grease on the nozzle threads....thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have blasted a few times now with the aluminum nozzle holder and no leaks of any kind. Also used lithium grease on the nozzle threads as suggested and it seems to be working well with no issues.

Still trying to get my abrasive setting figured out. I'm probably trying to use the least amount of abrasive but it's costing me time in getting things done. I need to figure out where it's to little or it's to much and set it in the middle. I use New Age glass for abrasive...mostly 40/70 so far.

I'm also finding out small items don't really work for what someone would be willing to pay versus the time it takes me to do them. Sometimes it seems to be cheaper to just tell them to go buy a new one.
 

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Todd
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Don't forget what you just typed... It's sometimes the case, and it's not you or your business's fault that someone's item isn't worth the investment on your side of the coin. And sometimes you just want to turn on your business and make a few dollars just to create revenue enough to keep the business running. The key is finding out your nut to crack and how much it cost to run things down to the dollar.
 
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