Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,078 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
One of the biggest problems I am faced with is cutting thick stock (up to 2 inches thick) in scroll patterns and keeping the cut perpendicular.

Bosch has come out with a new jig saw trying to help with the issue and from reviews so far the results seem to be better than other attempts by other manufacturers so far. They are calling it 50% more blade accuracy which is a lot if it is true. It has two arms that clamp down on the blade with the press of a button, they end up just off the work surface.



1) Never owned a Bosch anything - how do they stack up in your experience.

2) In regard to specifically what this saw is designed to do, do you have any tricks or techinques you have adopted, I've gone so far as purchasing blades based on thicker the better, putting in an exagerated table tilt prior to cutting... ect...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,292 Posts
I have used the older Bosch jigsaw and I liked it. I did have trouble cutting 2 by material that was not a soft wood. But over all I would buy one if I used a jigsaw all the time.

I do like the bosch skill saw too except for the tables look at them wrong and they break. Would prefer a MAG 77 table to the bosch's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
Mike Finley said:
1) Never owned a Bosch anything - how do they stack up in your experience.
I have both a Bosch jigsaw as well as a Bosch roto-hammer. I love both.
I bought the jigsaw after repeatedly trying, with my old Craftsman, to cut a decent semi-cirle out of a piece of 3/4 plywood I was using to make a basin pedestal. What a joke that was. I'm in no way shape or form a carpenter but with the Bosch and was able to cut a near perfect edge on the first try. I've only used it about a dozen times since on odds and ends but I sure love having a tool that makes me look good. The blade guides do just what they're supposed to.
After trying for 30 minutes to get a Hilti salesman at HD I bought a Bosch 'Boschhammer'. We use it pretty frequently for both drilling and chipping. I use to exclusively buy Hilti hammerdrills - never again after using the Bosch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
Bosch are the only saw of this type that I have purchased in the last few years. IMHO they are the best.
No 'tricks' just the standard stuff, right blade for the job, shoe square with the blade, blade sharp, take your time and let the tool do the work. Most people try to use this saw too fast, this will cause the blade to dull quicker and also cause it to deflect off of hard spots like knots. Once the blade bites it (bends, dulls on one side more than the other, overheats) the straight cut is over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
Mike Finley said:
One of the biggest problems I am faced with is cutting thick stock (up to 2 inches thick) in scroll patterns and keeping the cut perpendicular.
This is what I use for doing delicate scroll work in thick stock.

Just plunge cut right down to the bumper spikes and scroll away :Thumbs:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Funny Mike..

I've got a Dewalt that looks similar to the Bosch. I've had good luck with it-- best I've had as far as blade deflection. It has a wheel that stabalizes the blade and/or changes the stroke of the blade for faster cutting.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,078 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I think I might have the same one you are using. But the wheel on mine where the blade sits is a bit wide so the blade has a lot of play back and forth and the wheel sits about a 1/2 inch above the work surface making it even less effective. The design of the Bosch looks to be a bit better, making it the reason I am considering getting one if it really would help.

Hey, why would someone prefer the handle grip configuration


over the barrel grip configuration?
 

·
Deck Designer/Builder
Joined
·
2,430 Posts
The handle grip makes it easier to run the saw with one hand and hold your stock in the other hand. I do a lot of my work solo and when I use a jigsaw it isn't for overly precise cutting, eg. cut-outs in deck surface for posts, cut-outs for skirting around posts, small notches, etc. I do my cuts right next to where I'm working and don't like to waste time clamping things down or having to make my flunkie run over and hold the wood.

Also, not that it's as good a jigsaw, but I picked up a cordless Ryobi last fall. It doesn't do the absolute best cuts on thick boards but for 3/4" skirting or 5/4" deck boards it works good - especially since I use cedar the most. Not having another cord to worry about and move around made the $99 investment well worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
I found the barrel grip a little awkward at first but now I am used to it and there really isn't much difference.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top