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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just finished framing this 3000 sqft house.
The siding will be a rough cut poplar ran vertical/board and batten style.
The underside of front porch gets rusty tin. homeowner wants a rustic cabin look. I believe it will look great.
I will get more pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. homeowner chose it. I have installed all the usuall types of siding.this is a first though.
The poplar is rough cut 1x10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Dont hear of a lot of cypress these days or poplar. He is going to stain it. I have pics but having trouble getting them on
10ft up will be poplar and the gables are getting vinyl siding.The inside is getting
all wood. Poplar,cedar,and pine on all walls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
We shall see i guess he picked it up at a deal.front porch is covered entire
length of house. So it is in dry. He insisted on using it. I do think with care and maint.. It will last a good while. I have seen barns 100 years old with untreated poplar that has very little rot.
i hope it does good because it looks great. I will have pictures eventually!
 

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I hope so too, but it is not the same as 100 year old poplar unfortunately. I hope for his sake I am wrong, but it is well known not to use poplar outside. I wouldn't mention it to him at this point. Prime those ends well.
Yellow poplar is what they used then, and generally yellow poplar is marketed as "poplar" now. It will last if it doesn't touch the ground and is vertical.
 
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A friend that owns a mill said it has to do with old school air drying with old-growth vs. modern kiln-drying and how it affects new-growth poplar.(???)

You got Carpenter Bees? Advise him to buy tennis rackets for the whole family.
 
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I wish you the best and the house looks very nice but I agree with Kent.You can do many things with poplar but I would not use it for exterior siding.Not saying it won't work but I wish you the best.As was said before,Make sure the ends are sealed well.I would also back coat it.Poplar tendts to move a lot.
 

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Yellow poplar is what they used then, and generally yellow poplar is marketed as "poplar" now. It will last if it doesn't touch the ground and is vertical.
I keep hearing two completely different sides to the exterior poplar thing.

I wonder why such a huge gap in people's experience?
 

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New growth and old growth poplar are essentially the same, they both grew fast and have wide growth rings, basically the same. I've never personally heard of a difference in weatherability between kiln dried vs air dried but I could be wrong. Back in the day they usually put it up green, right off the sawmill. If you really want to do some research on the subject, ask at forestryforum.com, those guys really know their stuff when it comes to wood.
 
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I keep hearing two completely different sides to the exterior poplar thing.

I wonder why such a huge gap in people's experience?
Because noone uses poplar for siding anymore, so most people don't know. It's true it doesn't last outside - when used for furniture or deckboards, but for siding its a different story, because water doesnt pool on its surface and it gets a chance to dry out.
 
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I just bought some to match existing on an old house I'm re-doing.

It'll get solid stain though.

Another friend at another mill claims it is just fine with any good finish and maintenance.

If I did a B&B job with it, I would make sure I had a rainscreen behind for a good air gap.
 

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Keep in mind it has to be yellow poplar - aka tulip tree, which isn't a true poplar, it's actually in the magnolia family. It's just sold as poplar 99% of the time. If it has greenish heartwood then it's the right stuff.

True poplar won't hold up, its like cottonwood, which is also a poplar.
 
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