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I've been bidding new homes from prints for 4 or 5 years now. In the begining I over looked many things that later I tried to say "wasn't on the print" LOL

I orginally schooled and worked as a one piece set-up machinist...so prints looked a bit different when I started looking at new home prints from different builders.

This thread isn't about cost's, prices etc; I'd like to bring up "Stories", "Hint's / Tip's", commonly "overlooked" specs etc. Feel free add whatever quality info you'd care to share in how you look at prints.

I first figure all the doors and windows. Then I figure walls, and ceilings. Then I look at (for) more detailed objects like Staining, Stairwell spindles, Built in book cases, fireplace mantles...etc.

One thing that is commonly overlooked and not alway's on a "Spec" sheet...if one is provided...is Crown Moulding. Some builders I work with alway's use it in a few area's, others don't, but sometimes do; and not all builders will supply a "spec" sheet.

I hate charging "Extra's". I like to be upfront on my bid as to what I'm doing and not doing...comes down to communication with the GC or designer. I can seperate cost's later on a bid, but I like to supply as much as I can on the bid as the "print" is drafted.

Any "Stories"?

-Martin :)
 

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Well, I am not in painting, but when I do a "take off" on floor plans from a blueprint, I do not order materials until the framing is done and I can do a physical measure.

Is there some way you can do a rough "take off" then do a physical measure after framing, or is this not practical from a painters aspect?
 

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undefined
Martin said:
I've been bidding new homes from prints for 4 or 5 years now. In the begining I over looked many things that later I tried to say "wasn't on the print" LOL

I orginally schooled and worked as a one piece set-up machinist...so prints looked a bit different when I started looking at new home prints from different builders.

This thread isn't about cost's, prices etc; I'd like to bring up "Stories", "Hint's / Tip's", commonly "overlooked" specs etc. Feel free add whatever quality info you'd care to share in how you look at prints.

I first figure all the doors and windows. Then I figure walls, and ceilings. Then I look at (for) more detailed objects like Staining, Stairwell spindles, Built in book cases, fireplace mantles...etc.

One thing that is commonly overlooked and not alway's on a "Spec" sheet...if one is provided...is Crown Moulding. Some builders I work with alway's use it in a few area's, others don't, but sometimes do; and not all builders will supply a "spec" sheet.

I hate charging "Extra's". I like to be upfront on my bid as to what I'm doing and not doing...comes down to communication with the GC or designer. I can seperate cost's later on a bid, but I like to supply as much as I can on the bid as the "print" is drafted.

Any "Stories"?

-Martin :)
 

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igorsoccersocce said:
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Hello Martine . I am in the business about 2 years . I would like to learn how to read a blue print for painting contractor . You are the one who has expiriance and understanding . How could I learn about it , where is the book specificly published for it . I need help .
 

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igorsoccersocce said:
Hello Martine . I am in the business about 2 years . I would like to learn how to read a blue print for painting contractor . You are the one who has expiriance and understanding . How could I learn about it , where is the book specificly published for it . I need help .

you may look at the local libray or check into classes at a local community collage.

Blueprints are pretty standard...doors, windows, room deminsions etc. Sometimes there are "hidden" items not specified directly. That's where knowing how to look at a print helps, and the experience of doing jobs.
(i.e type of trim, base, crown moulding, built in book cases, fireplace mantles, closet shelfing cleats etc etc etc etc)

I do not know of any "books" directly. I learned reading prints years ago when I schooled as a machinist. Homebuilding prints weren't too hard to pick up on.

Much of luck to you! I'm sure if you run into questions with it myself or someone on here would be happy to try and help you.

-Martin :)
 

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Grumpy said:
My best advice is stay away from new const :) I make alot more on remodeling than I do on new const... plus I've never met a builder who doesn't treat me like a pawn in a chess game.
...plus I've never met a builder who doesn't treat me like a pawn in a chess game...

You must just be a pawn then...you need to learn to be a better chess piece...otherwise your nothing but a rug...and get stepped on all day long....and cat's and dogs like to drag there...well you know what on them too...makes a good itching surface!

:)
 

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I did learn to be a better chess piece and stopped doing new construction, unless I have control over my own projects. There are just some builders/gc/s people in general that run their business by taking advantage of everyone they do business with.

Step 1) Read and re-read your sub agreement. Have a lawyer read it if you really really want the job and don't understand something.

Step 2) Cross out anything you do not agree with and add in anything you think may be missing from the agreement. Sub agreements are pretty much one sided to favor the GC.

Step 3) Don't do the job to the GC's spec if you don't like the spec. I do it my way or I don't do it at all. Seldom do I find a spec I feel to be up to my standards. Often time The architect copies and pastes some paragraphs from a manufacturer's website which has nothing to do with the project at hand. I've lost alot of jobs because I didn't want to do it wrong.

Step 4) Everything in writing. If I have a verbal conversation with a GC, I always make it a point to now summarize the conversation in writing and ask froma response if they disagree with my summarization. I don't like playing the "cover my ass at every second of the day" game but I have to in new construction.

Step 5) Ask your price. I know too many guys who give builders and GC's a break on price... and for what? I use a spreadsheet to calculate my price and the price MS Excel tells them to pay is the price they pay if they want me to do the work.

Step 6) Be sure you write the date and version number of the drawings if you are bidding from print. I have had builders/gc's try to make me eat changes because they never sent me ammendements or print revisions. The refrence to print no., date, etc... saved my ass.

For all the EXTRA WORK involved in new construction it doesn't make financial sence to me to do new construction when I can make MORE MONEY FASTER and EASIER by dealing direct with the customer.
 

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Grumpy, I think that you are going places. I fell into a lot of potholes in my journey through life, many through my own ignorance (we didn't have the luxury of the web back then). I made it through pretty well in the end though. You have all of the advantages in your favor and you use them all well. I'm impressed.
 

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For all the EXTRA WORK involved in new construction it doesn't make financial sence to me to do new construction when I can make MORE MONEY FASTER and EASIER by dealing direct with the customer.
Right on. Only new construction I do is some vinyl w/c or murals. New const/painting is all about the lowest bid. I can't remember when I was the lowest bid. And who wants to wait for their money for 30+ days, as the GC plays with your money to make himself more money. New const. is all about robbing Peter to pay Paul. Ain't worth it in my opinion.

BTW, excellent advice from Grumpy.
 
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