Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend is having a deck framed. He has asked me to come in at the end and install the composite deck material, including a compass design. I have tried to research the subject, but have not been able to find much detailed information. I am looking for feedback on installing blocking for a compass. I attached a sample of how I would imagine it could be done, though it is not the actual plans, nor is it to scale.

I have experience building skateboard ramps and framing houses and feel comfortable that the task is within the scope of my abilities. I have never worked with the composite material. From what I can gather, it is not difficult to work with and can be easily cut for such a design. Is this true?
Based on the sample image, how would you recommend I do the blocking?

Thanks in advance.
 

Attachments

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
A friend is having a deck framed. He has asked me to come in at the end and install the composite deck material, including a compass design. I have tried to research the subject, but have not been able to find much detailed information. I am looking for feedback on installing blocking for a compass. I attached a sample of how I would imagine it could be done, though it is not the actual plans, nor is it to scale.

I have experience building skateboard ramps and framing houses and feel comfortable that the task is within the scope of my abilities. I have never worked with the composite material. From what I can gather, it is not difficult to work with and can be easily cut for such a design. Is this true?
Based on the sample image, how would you recommend I do the blocking?

Thanks in advance.
I would consider 12" centers on the joists in the area of the compass and do a grid of 12" center blocks perpendicular to the joists in that area also. You should be covered for the most part, although you may have to fill in the areas at the "tips" with more blocking.:thumbsup:
 
  • Like
Reactions: TopFloor

·
Premium Member
Retired deck builder
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
While those inlays look really cool they usually are a problem down the road. All the blocking keeps dirt/leaves/dog hair/whatever from being able to pass thru the cracks in the boards, thus leaving a messy spot that is hard to clean. That is if you lay blocking flat at the top of the joist to catch both sides.

If you do inlays double block to allow crap to pass thru.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired deck builder
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
I just want to clarify- when you say 'double block' , are you saying, "do not install the blocking laying flat." ?

Thanks for the help.
Exactly, block edgeways on each side of inlay. I know a real pita, but if the customer is willing to pay to do it right that's the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Exactly, block edgeways on each side of inlay...
I get what you mean. My mock-up showed single blocking. I redid it to show the double and I think it looks like what you are suggesting. Thank you very much.
 

Attachments

·
Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,706 Posts
The reason for the grid is to provide the support without needing all of the angled cutting and screwing, is that right?
I get what you mean. My mock-up showed single blocking. I redid it to show the double and I think it looks like what you are suggesting. Thank you very much.
Your sketch sets you up for
a lot of angle cuts that will
only be possible with a hand saw.
Try to plan for more "doubled-up"
joist, and perpendicular blocking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
...Try to plan for more "doubled-up"
joist, and perpendicular blocking...
I know it is missing some blocks, but is this roughly what you are suggesting? I can see it would be much easier to do like this and could offer support equal to or better than the other idea.

Thanks for your time.
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
917 Posts
Thats an interesting take... I could see that having its own benefits as well.
Seriously I think you'd be ripping out and changing your pre-blocking, cussing cause this one was 1" off etc. Hard to forsee that sort of thing, might even have changes while building it.

Also I would mock up the compass on a flat surface, get everything perfect, then install on deck.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired deck builder
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
Your sketch sets you up for
a lot of angle cuts that will
only be possible with a hand saw.
Neo, that is not true, all of those cuts can be done with a circular saw. Let me try to explain how it's done.

Say you want a 65 degree bevel, first cut on a 90 degree, then substract 65 from 90 = 25. Set your saw on 25 degree bevel. Now cut the end cut (the 1 1/2" side) on 25 degrees, either an up or down cut depending on which way you want the bevel. Once you get past 65 degrees a 7 1/4" blade will no longer cut all the way thru so you have to mark the top & bottom of the board & cut that on a 90 then finish off the little piece in the middle with a saw saw, that or get out a 8 1/4" saw if you have one.

For blocking on that deck I'd either cut short to short on 45 degrees or square cuts if the under side on the deck does not show. No point in doing all that work on blocking that will never be seen.

However if you ever do need to make those bevel cuts greater than 45 degrees it can be done & shows a skill level beyond the common carpenter.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired deck builder
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
Also I would mock up the compass on a flat surface, get everything perfect, then install on deck.
I like that idea. Make your mock up out of a piece of plywood, set it perfectly in place, then you know exactly where to block. Lay decking to plywood, remove plywood & deck the inlay.

However you tackle this deck, just make sure those folks are paying a premium cause it's going to be a lot more work than a regular deck.
 

·
Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,706 Posts
Neo, that is not true, all of those cuts can be done with a circular saw. Let me try to explain how it's done.

Say you want a 65 degree bevel, first cut on a 90 degree, then substract 65 from 90 = 25. Set your saw on 25 degree bevel. Now cut the end cut (the 1 1/2" side) on 25 degrees, either an up or down cut depending on which way you want the bevel. Once you get past 65 degrees a 7 1/4" blade will no longer cut all the way thru so you have to mark the top & bottom of the board & cut that on a 90 then finish off the little piece in the middle with a saw saw, that or get out a 8 1/4" saw if you have one.

For blocking on that deck I'd either cut short to short on 45 degrees or square cuts if the under side on the deck does not show. No point in doing all that work on blocking that will never be seen.

However if you ever do need to make those bevel cuts greater than 45 degrees it can be done & shows a skill level beyond the common carpenter.
I want to see pix cutting, say
15º, from the face of a 2x.
Even 30º would be cool.
Never too late to pick up
on something I've missed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
We use "Jaws" to cut steeply angled blocking. "Jaws" is our affectionate name for the 16" Makita beam saw.

A plywood template is the only way to go for inlays like these. You can move it around, orientate it in different directions, all before you place your first block or deck board.

You can also use the template as a guide for cutting out the decking.
 

·
Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,706 Posts
Neo, that is not true, all of those cuts can be done with a circular saw. Let me try to explain how it's done.

Say you want a 65 degree bevel, first cut on a 90 degree, then substract 65 from 90 = 25. Set your saw on 25 degree bevel. Now cut the end cut (the 1 1/2" side) on 25 degrees, either an up or down cut depending on which way you want the bevel. Once you get past 65 degrees a 7 1/4" blade will no longer cut all the way thru so you have to mark the top & bottom of the board & cut that on a 90 then finish off the little piece in the middle with a saw saw, that or get out a 8 1/4" saw if you have one.

For blocking on that deck I'd either cut short to short on 45 degrees or square cuts if the under side on the deck does not show. No point in doing all that work on blocking that will never be seen.

However if you ever do need to make those bevel cuts greater than 45 degrees it can be done & shows a skill level beyond the common carpenter.
I want to see pix cutting, say
15º, from the face of a 2x.
Even 30º would be cool.
Never too late to pick up
on something I've missed.
I mis-read you the first time. :laughing:
I think that's what I do, except
for the sharp hand saw instead
of a sawzall.
Mark the angle across the 1½"
side.
Stand it on edge,
cut as deep as you can.
Finish cutting with a hand saw,
using the side of the original cut
as a guide. :thumbsup:
 

·
Premium Member
Retired deck builder
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
I mis-read you the first time. :laughing:
I think that's what I do, except
for the sharp hand saw instead
of a sawzall.
Mark the angle across the 1½"
side.
Stand it on edge,
cut as deep as you can.
Finish cutting with a hand saw,
using the side of the original cut
as a guide. :thumbsup:
No, you read it right the first time. The method you just mentioned does work, but not as fast or as clean a cut because you make the all or almost all the cut in one sweep.

No can do pix, but I'm sure you can picture this in your mind. Say, cutting a rafter on a roof. You cut your pitch square, now you stand the rafter on end on your sawhorses & have someone hold the board. If you want a 70 degree cut put your circular saw on a 20 degree bevel, Now put the saw table on the very end cut (the 1 1/2" x 5 1/2" side if 2x6 rafter) & cut downward or upwards depending on which way you want the bevel, cutting along one edge. You can also just flip the board over to rotate which way the bevel goes.

Like I said if more than about 65 degrees you have to whip out your big burtha saw or finish off with reciprecating saw or hand saw. This has come in handy for me when cutting gazebo jack rafters which are always on a greater than 45 degree angle. That is if you want an exposed rafter look with cedar shake roof, not using a ceiling.
 

·
solar guy
Joined
·
1,917 Posts
I would consider 12" centers on the joists in the area of the compass and do a grid of 12" center blocks perpendicular to the joists in that area also. You should be covered for the most part, although you may have to fill in the areas at the "tips" with more blocking.:thumbsup:
I think I'd block it after the fact, other then what was absolutely neccessary to hold it in place.
Seriously I think you'd be ripping out and changing your pre-blocking, cussing cause this one was 1" off etc. Hard to forsee that sort of thing, might even have changes while building it.

Also I would mock up the compass on a flat surface, get everything perfect, then install on deck.
All great ideas especially the plywood mock up as it will allow you to orient the compass rose to point true north even if the deck doesn't. Remember to calculate variation into the compass reading.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top