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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to install sill plate on block begining this week and the mason has left me in a mess. The block is out at least 1 1/2" higher in one area the the rest of the block around the perimeter. Also there is a center support wall running through the basement which is 1" higher than perimeter and it is the center support for I-joist which will span from one side to other. How do you go back and compensate for this with sill plate? Can you go back and level the top of the block in anyway? I thought of pouring a 6" cap ontop of block to make it level all the way around perimeter what you guys think?
 

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I need to install sill plate on block begining this week and the mason has left me in a mess. The block is out at least 1 1/2" higher in one area the the rest of the block around the perimeter. Also there is a center support wall running through the basement which is 1" higher than perimeter and it is the center support for I-joist which will span from one side to other. How do you go back and compensate for this with sill plate? Can you go back and level the top of the block in anyway? I thought of pouring a 6" cap ontop of block to make it level all the way around perimeter what you guys think?
Hold your "Mason" (handyman?, out of work electrician) accountable for his crappy work if he can't afford it buy him a string.


If your "mason" won't stand behind his work I suppose you could cut out the High spots using a 1/4" grinder and 7" masonry blade or a quickie saw and the low spots fur out with treated.
 

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Sounds like you need a better mason.

If you are the GC and hired this guy, make HIM fix it.
If you are the carpentry sub, show the GC/homeowner the issue and explain that you cannot build on top of his work without compromising the quality of your work.
 

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Sky hook I didnt expect a response like that from you.:blink:

String sag is common, but so is the solution. LIke Spindrah said, thats what twigs are for. Or tighten the line up!

I assume were talking about a garage wall, house, or addition here? The run shouldnt be that long where he couldnt tighten the line up or twig it to get the sag out.

And if you bring it up to him Im sure he will say something about the footing being out of level, unless he did the footing too.

If he does, tell him he should have taken that into acct on his first course and cut the block as needed to make his starter course level.

It amounts to shoddy work.

Did you go with the cheapest one?
 

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Leveling up with concrete gets messy and you cant feather out or go to thin. Shoot the site with a transit or laser, find your high point, using acq build up accordingly. Lay your plates(double), there will be random gaps, go around with slate shims, poge with concrete. You can get it right, it may take a day or two depending on the size of the job and the details. Backcharge the mason. Dont forget the termite shield, the sill seal will probably be a waste of time with the mess you describe .G PS, i have found cutting back the high spots , and correcting with concrete to be a more difficult way to repair these types of messes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for replies, I am the framing sub and had nothing to do with the mason. After checking further on the front of the garage door opening from one side to the other a 9'3" opening the mortor joints is out of line by 1" 1/2. There is one section that has a hight point of 1 1/2" and then runs down 1 1/4 over 10 ft area problem is that is the high spot on the whole foundation and I would have to shim the rest of the foundation up to match that high area. I hate to have a 1/4 million dollar house sit up on shims. If I could get the whole thing to double plate out to maybe 1/2" that would be within acceptible range. There is several off sets on this foundation with the longets wall being 64ft straight. These are the basement walls.
 

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Thanks for replies, I am the framing sub and had nothing to do with the mason. After checking further on the front of the garage door opening from one side to the other a 9'3" opening the mortor joints is out of line by 1" 1/2. There is one section that has a hight point of 1 1/2" and then runs down 1 1/4 over 10 ft area problem is that is the high spot on the whole foundation and I would have to shim the rest of the foundation up to match that high area. I hate to have a 1/4 million dollar house sit up on shims. If I could get the whole thing to double plate out to maybe 1/2" that would be within acceptible range. There is several off sets on this foundation with the longets wall being 64ft straight. These are the basement walls.
Crappy Crappy Crappy Crappy Crappy Crappy Work.

This obviously is the GC's issue then. How he chooses to deal with it will say a lot about him. I wouldn't get your expectations to high though. As has been said already if the extra work falls on you, you need to have in writing what the extra compensation will be!
 

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Sky hook I didnt expect a response like that from you.:blink:

String sag is common, but so is the solution. LIke Spindrah said, thats what twigs are for. Or tighten the line up!

I assume were talking about a garage wall, house, or addition here? The run shouldnt be that long where he couldnt tighten the line up or twig it to get the sag out.
Really now. :sad:
String is used to get a straight line, not a level line.
Water level, transit, builders level, lasers etc. is the only way to get accurate elevations. :thumbsup:
 

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If this was my job i would make the mason take the top course of block off and then relay with a lazer or transit..No way can this be fixed with a little cement...:rolleyes:
 

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If its just the walkout walls at the basement, you could check each section with a laser and cut studs to fit. It is not uncommon on walkouts with several corners, to not be exact. For the garage, I agree with the other guys who say to add a plate and notch to fit. Make sure this change in elevation won't cause any problems anywhere else. And by all means, Notify the GC that this will be a serious "extra" which should be back charged to the mason. If the GC won't pay you to do it, good luck getting your money from the mason.
 

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First of all, I don't know what trade "building" is. As far as I know, the Department of Labor doesn't recognize that as a trade. Are you general contractor, a home owner, a framer or what?

This is what site supervision is important. If you paying for site supervision, you're being ripped off. This should have been caught by the mason and the site super and corrected immediately.

At this point, its a matter for a mason or a framer to correct. If you're at most 1.5" out of level at your highest point, I would consider two half courses to correct, if you can go up without impinging on other aspects of your project, such as grade and aerial right of way, etc. If you can't go up, then take a course or two down and correct it.
 

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I need to install sill plate on block begining this week and the mason has left me in a mess. The block is out at least 1 1/2" higher in one area the the rest of the block around the perimeter. Also there is a center support wall running through the basement which is 1" higher than perimeter and it is the center support for I-joist which will span from one side to other. How do you go back and compensate for this with sill plate? Can you go back and level the top of the block in anyway? I thought of pouring a 6" cap ontop of block to make it level all the way around perimeter what you guys think?
Bite the bullet and trim a few studs.
Frame it up and quit your belly-achin'.
Be glad you have a job.
Are you sure you're not in over your head ?>
:laughing:
 

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Don't forget the nuts on the anchor bolts!!! (if the bolts are really there) - Framers are notorious for this. I did a study after some tornadoes and found over 70% of the homes damaged/destroyed did not have nuts on the bolts. - This is in comparison to 30-40% for nuts missing on the other homes.

Dick
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
After talking with GC we have decided to have mason remove top layer of block and try to re-level I will let you know how this works out.
 

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Really now. :sad:
String is used to get a straight line, not a level line.
Water level, transit, builders level, lasers etc. is the only way to get accurate elevations. :thumbsup:
:clap::thumbsup: someone gets it! lol

I get line levels for free all the time when I buy chalklines etc....they go right in the garbage. I trust my 1000 dollar laser....not a 4.50 cent string that stretches and sag's. I only use stringlines for edges....and even then i use my 48 inch level to further insure im where i wanna be.


Straightline....might i suggest you or the GC stand over this guys shoulder. If I ever laid block like that i wouldnt have my business.
 
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