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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know direct pricing questions are frowned upon here but I need some help. I have been given the plans for an 8500 sf building, no interior walls, trusses, T 1-11 siding with 1" high R under siding, 2x6 walls, 12' eave height. Building is on a slab, flat site.

I know my crews work but haven't built one quite this large before.
I guess I'm looking for reassurance in my plan of attack.

Break each item down, IE) frame and stand walls
set trusses, sheath roof, eave and gable trim detail, insulate and side, trim windows and doors.

I turned down a couple of large pole barns this winter as the money they wanted to pay was well below what I could/would do the work for.

Any help greatly appreciated,
dave:thumbsup:
 

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Couple of things to consider:

That is a lot of area with np interior walls.
How you going to plumb & line it &stabalize it for trusses?

Shear wall engineering? Hold downs? Blocking?

Stick for setting trusses & loading roof sheathing?

Scaffolding?

With that much wall area be very careful of any wind that may come up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I hear ya Griz, thanks. There is actually a centered portion that is perpendicular the rest on one side. Bracing will be from outside until trusses are on and they are braced. There are quite a few wondows and doors as well as 6 12' overhead doors.

I'm thinking of renting two scissor lifts and a crane for setting trusses.
dave
 

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That is one way to do it.

I worked on a frameing crew for years and as the one that had the tag line and hooked the trusses, I detest outside braces.

If the floor is poured, tapcons and a lot of lineal 2x4 braces. Then a bunch of guys in the trusses nailing what we called truss block from the last truss to the next.

We also had lots of 2x4's tapconed for the truss bracing to the floor.

We never had any problems. The key is to have as much done ahead of time before the crane shows up.

I can't remember for sure but I think the largest we did was 70' clear span.

We always ad a bunch of guys both in the trusses and on the ground to help keep things moving.
 

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I hear ya Griz, thanks. There is actually a centered portion that is perpendicular the rest on one side. Bracing will be from outside until trusses are on and they are braced. There are quite a few wondows and doors as well as 6 12' overhead doors.

I'm thinking of renting two scissor lifts and a crane for setting trusses.
dave
Forget the crane and rent a telehandler. My area I can get one for $1500/month, crane is 200/ hr.
Telehandlers are much more useful. I have hung 81' wide trusses with them no problem.

Definitely two lifts thou

I Only put up 100' of building at a time until roof is on.
 

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I see a lot of office buildings like that. The only bearing walls are the exterior walls (or sometimes a common corridor wall), so they frame all of the interiors out of LG metal studs.

The best advice I can give is to look at your man hours at the end of your estimate. You can spend a lot of time looking at the details and pricing each piece, but you have to see the forest for the trees.

I have gotten into tons of detail priced everything individually, then at the end I realized I have 12 weeks to frame a 7,500 sf office building. I needed to cut it in half. It would be worse the other direction.
 

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FWIW, if you have a bunch of openings and the sheathing is on, that roof won't want to stay if a wind pops up. A big building not too far from here was sheathed and all the window / door openings done - then came the gusts, and the whole thing ended up on the ground. Roof lifted, and the walls caved, since the trusses weren't holding them any more.
 

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You don't mention how tall these walls are.

If there is enough real estate, build the roof out in the open on the ground, stand the trusses, all blocking, sheeting, add extra supports, then have the crane come and lift it. You may need to do it in 2-3 sections. It's a hell of a lot easier working from the ground then in the air.

Once the crane sets it in place, make all your connection details, tie all together and your done.

Much safer then the typical one truss at a time. It only works if you have the space to build on the ground and once you've done it once you will want to do it over and over again
 
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