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I personally would not force the detail to be tight on both sides. The tolerances would be frustrating to pull off.

That last drawing would be fine without the large piece on top. Just take the off fall and place it on top of the bottom piece. Call it good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I personally would not force the detail to be tight on both sides. The tolerances would be frustrating to pull off.

That last drawing would be fine without the large piece on top. Just take the off fall and place it on top of the bottom piece. Call it good.
Thanks Gus, I think that's basically what's Tim was saying he did, but without the excess from the bevel rip ... and this is how we'll end up doing it, too.
 

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Thanks Gus, I think that's basically what's Tim was saying he did, but without the excess from the bevel rip ... and this is how we'll end up doing it, too.
You got it. I didn't have time to get any pictures today, but it looks like you understand it.

What you can do also is rip that out of 2x6 so you can get two pieces with 1 rip. Save yourself some time.
 

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Double checking your work/?

Tim,

What method do you prefer to double check yourself before cutting all the I-joist rafters at once. Do you do the math twice, or do you actually cut a pair and "set them up"? ......seems like quit a commitment to make a careless mistake.

Ben
 

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Tim,

What method do you prefer to double check yourself before cutting all the I-joist rafters at once. Do you do the math twice, or do you actually cut a pair and "set them up"? ......seems like quit a commitment to make a careless mistake.

Ben
We recheck the math a few times and make sure the numbers you have are good, ie the span as measured across the topplates.

I've made the mistake twice, once last summer I was 9" too long for some dumb reason, and on my brothers first house :eek::whistling I read my tape upside down when I took the span. Whoops

I read 261 and the number should have been 291 or something like that.

On the I-joists I'd do the math and have Matt do the math. And double check that way.
 

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You guys are thinking too much.
Put a shim under it and block between them
Can you post a drawing? Because the mental picture I get from the language of your post makes me think sloppy or lazy and I don't think you are either.

The engineer wants the bevelled plate and the APA and the I-Joist manufacturer both show details for this, then why shim? I don't get it.

Also, nailing through the flanges through the beveled plate and into the topplate of the wall makes for a great connections. Also this way the blocking is nailed into the wall with solid bearing. In some cases I wonder if this would eliminate the hardware (A-35 or similar) that is sometimes spec'd to attach the blocking to the house for shear requirements. I bet if I talked to our engineer that would be true. You could alternate the nailing through the flange on the blocking into the wall.


But I get what you are saying, frame the roof, then put the plate in. The only problem I have with that is that if the roof is sheathed, using tools is tougher.
 

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Can you post a drawing? Because the mental picture I get from the language of your post makes me think sloppy or lazy and I don't think you are either.

The engineer wants the bevelled plate and the APA and the I-Joist manufacturer both show details for this, then why shim? I don't get it.

Also, nailing through the flanges through the beveled plate and into the topplate of the wall makes for a great connections. Also this way the blocking is nailed into the wall with solid bearing. In some cases I wonder if this would eliminate the hardware (A-35 or similar) that is sometimes spec'd to attach the blocking to the house for shear requirements. I bet if I talked to our engineer that would be true. You could alternate the nailing through the flange on the blocking into the wall.


But I get what you are saying, frame the roof, then put the plate in. The only problem I have with that is that if the roof is sheathed, using tools is tougher.
i don't see a problem ripping on a bevel and plating the walls. could do it before you stand the walls up that way you can carry the layout easily and have it all geared up to take the roof.
 

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Can you post a drawing? Because the mental picture I get from the language of your post makes me think sloppy or lazy and I don't think you are either.

The engineer wants the bevelled plate and the APA and the I-Joist manufacturer both show details for this, then why shim? I don't get it.

Also, nailing through the flanges through the beveled plate and into the topplate of the wall makes for a great connections. Also this way the blocking is nailed into the wall with solid bearing. In some cases I wonder if this would eliminate the hardware (A-35 or similar) that is sometimes spec'd to attach the blocking to the house for shear requirements. I bet if I talked to our engineer that would be true. You could alternate the nailing through the flange on the blocking into the wall.



But I get what you are saying, frame the roof, then put the plate in. The only problem I have with that is that if the roof is sheathed, using tools is tougher.

A drawing is out of the question, unless you want to wait for my daughter to get home and she will be in the right mood when she gets home.
If this is a 12/12 on a 2x6 wall, then you cut a triangle block that will fit under it and then blocks between the rafters to fit tightly for lateral support. maybe 2 rows of blocks. One on the inside edge and one on the outside edge, depending in the height of your rafter. I hardly ever have a table saw on my jobs, let alone one that would rip a 2x6 on a bevel.

You can do this before you sheet the roof. It would only make sense to
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
You got it. I didn't have time to get any pictures today, but it looks like you understand it.

What you can do also is rip that out of 2x6 so you can get two pieces with 1 rip. Save yourself some time.
Thanks Tim, I can't wait to frame this roof. Other than the low temps and blowing snow, it should be a lot of fun :thumbup:
 

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A drawing is out of the question, unless you want to wait for my daughter to get home and she will be in the right mood when she gets home.
If this is a 12/12 on a 2x6 wall, then you cut a triangle block that will fit under it and then blocks between the rafters to fit tightly for lateral support. maybe 2 rows of blocks. One on the inside edge and one on the outside edge, depending in the height of your rafter. I hardly ever have a table saw on my jobs, let alone one that would rip a 2x6 on a bevel.

You can do this before you sheet the roof. It would only make sense to
It doesn't make sense to unless the engineer says ok, or it is an accepted detail by the APA or the I-Joist manufacturer. Will it work? Probably.

Why 2 rows of blocks?

Can't make the steep bevel? Just rip the material on edge. That is what we did on the 8-12 roof that was in the pictures earlier.

I don't see the upside to the method you proposed. I see it as extra work. However with the beveled topplate, I see a myriad of benefits, all ready enumerated.

I just don't get why you insist that your method is so great to the exclusion of the tested and approved methods. For one thing, how many of these 12-12 blocks need to be cut? A whole lot more than ripping a 12' 2x6 and with each cut getting 24' of beveled plate.

It is the best option, the engineer spec'd it, it is has been tested and approved and from personal experience is works very well.

And you only need the table saw that one time, so if you own one this is a moot issue (whether or not it is onsite everyday). You said "hardly ever have a table saw onsite", so if you have one, just rip the plates and be done with it.

Or I can do it and ship them to you :thumbsup::clap:
 

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I can't see using a block either, seems there would be a problem with it splitting. Whereas a nice long board won't split so easy.
 

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I have had this situation twice that I recall, once with a flat ceiling ,ceiling joists beside the rafter and a block under.
The other time we cut the studs on the pitch , it was not a flat ceiling.
Just depends on the situation.
 

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I have had this situation twice that I recall, once with a flat ceiling ,ceiling joists beside the rafter and a block under.
The other time we cut the studs on the pitch , it was not a flat ceiling.
Just depends on the situation.
with flat ceiling i'd still run beveled plate continuous, then cut out where the joists would sit. if you're on a 2x6 plate then you can just sit the joists on the inside 2" of plate and leave the rest for the beveled piece. just seems like putting little shims under each tji would not make for a good connection as opposed to having a continuous piece than you can nail anywhere
 

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Hey Bob...

I thought this might help if not for this project, for future reference. I cringe when I hear the words I-Joist and Rafter used in the same sentence because SO MANY TIMES, I've been called out to jobs where they're installed wrong or cut wrong.. sometimes bearing on the web or not attached properly... I just dread it because if it is not done properly the repairs are usually VERY costly.

I am attaching some details that I hope help.. at least I am attempting to - having difficulties for some reason! :furious:
 

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