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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're going to be using I-Joists on a roof for the first time, and the engineer has specified a beveled bearing plate on the top plate for the I-Joists to rest upon. The walls are 2 x 6 and we have a couple of ideas for the bearing plate: rip a beveled plate out of 6 x 6 post, or build up 2x material where each layer of 2x has been individually run through a table saw.

We're just looking for the fastest (and most cost effective) way to do this, but not sure how everyone else is doing it.
 

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We're going to be using I-Joists on a roof for the first time, and the engineer has specified a beveled bearing plate on the top plate for the I-Joists to rest upon. The walls are 2 x 6 and we have a couple of ideas for the bearing plate: rip a beveled plate out of 6 x 6 post, or build up 2x material where each layer of 2x has been individually run through a table saw.

We're just looking for the fastest (and most cost effective) way to do this, but not sure how everyone else is doing it.
We have done this on 2 roofs. I ripped the bevelled plates out of a 2x4 to get two plates per rip. That gives plenty of bearing, on a 7-12 that is about 3" of bearing.

It is a very speedy process and not cutting a birdsmouth saves a lot of time. Also on your gable, lower your gable rafter and build a wall under it. This way you can put your lookouts over the top w/out notching.

Here is the photo album with these details. http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler/Lot35Muirkirk#
 

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We sent these 6x Glu-Lams out and had them ripped by a local shop.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PITCH? what is it 3 pitch or 12 pitch?GMOD
Gene, it's a 12:12

We have done this on 2 roofs. I ripped the bevelled plates out of a 2x4 to get two plates per rip. That gives plenty of bearing, on a 7-12 that is about 3" of bearing.

It is a very speedy process and not cutting a birdsmouth saves a lot of time. Also on your gable, lower your gable rafter and build a wall under it. This way you can put your lookouts over the top w/out notching.

Here is the photo album with these details. http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler/Lot35Muirkirk#
Thanks Tim. Good tip on lowering the gable rafter. When you used a 2x4 for your beveled plate how'd you handle the open space left between the top plate and the bottom of the I-joist?
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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On a 12/12 you would just be beveling one edge of a 2x4 and standing it up on the bevel. Then you need to rip another one to prop under the high side.

You would be better off ripping a 4x4 in half on the 45 and use both pieces for a full 3 1/2" bearing.

5/8" rock could span the gap between the top plate and the bottom of the rafter.

What is the stud size?
 

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Lindal sent out pre-ripped bevel pieces out of 2x4 and I added a 2 3/4" ripped piece behind it.

As long as you are using spec'd straps to connect the TJIs to one another at the ridge and the ridge is braced or structural, then there won't be much shear load at the plates. You will also be adding some kind of clip or strap at the plate (if Simpson has their way)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On a 12/12 you would just be beveling one edge of a 2x4 and standing it up on the bevel. Then you need to rip another one to prop under the high side.

You would be better off ripping a 4x4 in half on the 45 and use both pieces for a full 3 1/2" bearing.

5/8" rock could span the gap between the top plate and the bottom of the rafter.

What is the stud size?
Gus, the studs are 2x6x104-5/8. We've priced out 1/2" sheetrock for this build. 4x4's would work, but we'd just about have to go to the lumber yard and hand-pick them because we couldn't rely on them to deliver nice straight ones to us. Beveling a 2x6 on one edge and standing it up on the flat edge would cover the space on the high side, for sheetrock.

Going by loneframer's recommendation, we could use a 5-1/8" x 4-1/2" glulam and then stack a few pieces of OSB on the high side to bring it out flush to the wall for sheetrock.
 

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Just curious why a single 2x4 isn't enough? On a 12-12 you would have 2 1/8" of bearing. That is more than enough to transfer the load.



PlumbBob^2Pants,

We just ignored it. The drywall will span that easily. We normally only have about a 3" seatcut on dimensional lumber anyway, so this isn't an issue for us.

Last spring we drywalled the house we framed in the winter and framing the roof like this wasn't a problem when we drywalled. I'll try and get some shots today that show how this works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
We just ignored it. The drywall will span that easily. We normally only have about a 3" seatcut on dimensional lumber anyway, so this isn't an issue for us.

Last spring we drywalled the house we framed in the winter and framing the roof like this wasn't a problem when we drywalled. I'll try and get some shots today that show how this works.
Thanks Tim, pics of that would be very helpful and much appreciated. :thumbsup:
 

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Gus, the studs are 2x6x104-5/8. We've priced out 1/2" sheetrock for this build. 4x4's would work, but we'd just about have to go to the lumber yard and hand-pick them because we couldn't rely on them to deliver nice straight ones to us. Beveling a 2x6 on one edge and standing it up on the flat edge would cover the space on the high side, for sheetrock.

Going by loneframer's recommendation, we could use a 5-1/8" x 4-1/2" glulam and then stack a few pieces of OSB on the high side to bring it out flush to the wall for sheetrock.
With a 2x6 plate you would need about 7 13/16" piece of stock ripped on a 45 from long point to long point for the bevel on the inside to stack with the interior stud face. That seems a bit extreme to me.

Not sure how you are thinking a 2x6 would give you backing for drywall as you described. Maybe that was a brain fart, I'm intimately familiar with the syndrome.

Your 1/2" drywall will span the 5 1/2" IMO.

I would see if you can get this passed. All the cuts are easily handled on site and you only need one course of 2x4 to pull it off.

I hope this helps

Rafter.jpg

If you really wanted backing at the rafter line, just rip another 2x and nail it on the bottom of the rafter.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
With a 2x6 plate you would need about 7 13/16" piece of stock ripped on a 45 from long point to long point for the bevel on the inside to stack with the interior stud face. That seems a bit extreme to me.

Not sure how you are thinking a 2x6 would give you backing for drywall as you described. Maybe that was a brain fart, I'm intimately familiar with the syndrome.

Your 1/2" drywall will span the 5 1/2" IMO.

I would see if you can get this passed. All the cuts are easily handled on site and you only need one course of 2x4 to pull it off.

I hope this helps

If you really wanted backing at the rafter line, just rip another 2x and nail it on the bottom of the rafter.

Gus, thanks for taking the time to draw that out. Here's what I was talking about for backing to nail the sheetrock to ...
 

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