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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've got a family member who wants to have a silo demoed. I've got an idea how I'm going to go about it...what would you do? I'd be using a TLB. The silo is roughly 30-40' tall made of interlocking concrete blocks and metal bands. The top is open.
 

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I did one once, and saved the interlocking bricks to use as pavers. Really neat.

If your goal is to salvage the material, get a bucket truck, or boom lift. If you simply want it down safely, use a long steel cable, cinched around the silo, maybe 6 feet up, and far enough away to keep out of a possible debris field, and winch or pull....and it will take some power. Cutting it with a cable should make it fall into it's own footprint, more or less...and don't forget a picture for us.
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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Torch the rings, leaving approximately every third ring. Then knock out the bottom like dropping a tree. Did one ninety feet tall about 25 years ago. Came down like a ton of bricks.:clap:
 

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I found that a tlb is too slow to get out of the way if it doesn't feel right. I've done them with a sledge hammer just knocking out one row until it starts to creak, stand back annd watch it fall.
 

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Something like this?

Thinking about taking this down, but it's poured concrete. Walls are about 2' thick near the bottom and thin out as it rises.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I found that a tlb is too slow to get out of the way if it doesn't feel right. I've done them with a sledge hammer just knocking out one row until it starts to creak, stand back annd watch it fall.

That's really the one thing making me uneasy...I figured I'd knock out a few blocks on the side I wanted it to fall to and push or pull it that way with the backhoe. If things went wrong I wouldn't be able to get out of the way of it falling. I'll probably just do as you said, keep knocking blocks out until it falls on its own.

If I had a long steel cable "cutting" it would be the easiest way though I question whether I would get enough traction and or power to pull through it with my tlb.
 

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One of them that I did was already leaning real bad, so I thought I could just reach high up with the backhoe and push it over, well it just slid over 10' or so and collapsed about 10'. So now I had a 30' tall silo standing straighter than it was when I got there and I had the foundation etc. between the tlb and the silo so I couldn't reach very high at all. That was why I got out the sledge and started swinging.
 

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Master of the Underground
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It's an expansive grout to fracture concrete, rock, or masonary
would this work on a poured wall silo? Maybe if drilling holes? I will try and get a picture of this tomorrow or sunday. its similar to what bill z posted but taller and only a 10'x10' hole at the bottom and an open top.
 

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Dig with BIG TOYS
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dexpan would probably work really well for this... put it in half of the circle and watch the whole thing come down. I know from experience that **** really dose a good job... they use it to mine granite in the quarries so im sure that this silo woudnt be to big a challenge
 

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Al Smith
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dexpan would probably work really well for this... put it in half of the circle and watch the whole thing come down. I know from experience that **** really dose a good job... they use it to mine granite in the quarries so im sure that this silo woudnt be to big a challenge

But arent the masonry units that were used in the above silo videos hollow? How would you use dexpan in the above examples?
 
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