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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys! I hope all has been well for everyone?!?!?!


What is the most feasible type of pipe to use for a culvert other than galvanized or PVC? I have price polyethylene, but they are the same as the A2000. Below are prices I obtained locally (Louisiana)
  • 24 inch Galvanized = $14.80/ft
  • 36 inch Galvanized = $24.65/ft
  • 24 inch A-2000 (PVC) = $19.70/ft
  • 36 inch A-2000 (PVC) = $36.70/ft
I have priced some, but the customer is not happy with the overall price of the materials, so after an exhausting search I thought I would check with you guys to see if you know of a supplier with a cheaper price or a different type material to use.

I am also passed the point of not providing a free estimate. The customer is starting to draw out this process with the expectancy of me continuing the "free initial estimate"
 

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If that is what is readily available in your area it doesn't do any good to shop around. Seems like shipping costs would wipe out any savings you may find. Do your local codes say anything about the type culvert to use?
 

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R c p

wtf, i'm trying to type in RCP, keeps not letting me capitalize the c and p...anyway....reinforced concrete pipe
 

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Those prices seem reasonable. Tell them you will install the pipe, if he buys it and has it delivered to the job.
 

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hard to believe galvanized is approved any where, will need replacement in about 15 years. Had to replace township road culvert this summer that I put in new in 88.
 

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hard to believe galvanized is approved any where, will need replacement in about 15 years. Had to replace township road culvert this summer that I put in new in 88.
We are starting to see large underground detention systems using galvanized pipe. Did two runs of 60 inch a couple years ago, all under parking lot, talk about a ticking time bomb :whistling
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
If that is what is readily available in your area it doesn't do any good to shop around. Seems like shipping costs would wipe out any savings you may find. Do your local codes say anything about the type culvert to use?
griz: I agree completely, but sometimes the customer isn't satisfied until something is shipped across the country (made an effort in getting to location) to establish its worth. Crazy...I know. :wacko:

....reinforced concrete pipe
Day: After prepping the ground for 5 foot sections vs. 20 foot galv. the labor would go up. Customer will not go for it. Period. :no:


Those prices seem reasonable. Tell them you will install the pipe, if he buys it and has it delivered to the job.
Rino: I offered that to them, but they wanted this job to be turn-key. They know how much it takes to get this taken care of, but they are not wanting to, apparently, pay for my time to organize. (It will however be included)

hard to believe galvanized is approved any where, will need replacement in about 15 years. Had to replace township road culvert this summer that I put in new in 88.
Durn: The customer is not worried about anything past 10 years from now. This is to fill in a run-off through the front yard of their property. A driveway is being considered to cross it, other than that it will have a 2 foot cap of soil on it When I install it, I will place barrier fabric (6 mil plastic or geofabric) to layer the dirt from coming in contact with the pipe itself. Not the best solution, but for their budget this is what I am offering.

Well, the guy would be better off spending the extra money on PVC. It isn't going to rust.
MW: I agree! The good thing about the PVC is it has a bell on it for faster installment and better sealing. IMO.

Galv. just is downright aggravating!


Thanks to everyone who gave their input, I greatly appreciate it!!!!

BTW: Check out my website. I am still working on loading up a lot of pictrures, so check back every once in awhile!!! www.fulcrumservicesllc.com
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Since I don't have an excavator, what size would you recommend to set prefab concrete basins ( 4ft x 4ft x 4ft) with lid, 10 - 15 feet out from center swing of the excavator?

The basin is estimated at 7500 lbs. total
 

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I don't know machines that well, but you could do some research and find out what type of machines could lift that kind of weight. I'd think you'd need at least a 10 ton machine to lift that kind of weight with that reach. Of course you don't want to be maxing the machine either.
 

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Since I don't have an excavator, what size would you recommend to set prefab concrete basins ( 4ft x 4ft x 4ft) with lid, 10 - 15 feet out from center swing of the excavator?

The basin is estimated at 7500 lbs. total
A 120 size machine would be pushing it, I would use a at least a 150 size machine. I just set a 8,800 lb inlet with my 200. Swung out over the side and she didn't even flinch.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
These guys around here are suggesting I get a 330!!!

I used to operate cranes for a living, but never an excavator (principle the same). I needed to know what size I would need. I do have access to a 160 Deere.

Thanks for the help!!!
 

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If you have to, you can take the bucket off to shed weight.
 
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