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Looking for best tip size to spray interior trim. I have a graco x5 and use use behr paint. I have a 313 but think maybe there's something better. I am new to spraying
 

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3-13 is fine. Buy a whip hose. It's a short length of smaller diameter hose that goes on the end of your airless hose. It allows for easier hand movement when spraying with the gun.
 

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3/13 is a good size. Don't max out the pressure, just enough to get a good fan. This will reduce blowback and increase transfer efficiency.

Using the right paint is critical. There are a number of characteristics that vary product to product that make a huge difference.

Non-enamel paints will not block ie the paint will stick to itself if on two different touching surfaces. A good trim paint will block almost as soon as it is dry to the touch. In the past I have had horrible blocking issues with Valspar. Sherwin Solo Gloss is superb at blocking.

Layout. A good trim paint will lay out/flow very smooth even if the millage is low. Sherwin proclassic orange peels easily if put on too light, but runs like crazy if you put a touch too much on. Sherwin solo gloss flows very well and dries quickly. You should always be increasing the heat in your work area to deal with the moisture produce and to get the coating to set quickly. Turn up the heat and bring a couple shop lights.

Sandability. Some paints will sand off in a powder, others will peel off. Proclassic will sand, which is good because it always runs like a mofo. Solo will sand if you need too but you generally won't.
 

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Pro Painters
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We don't do a lot of interior spraying but when we do I use one of those fine finish 209's. It leaves a very nice finish but tip gets blown out pretty quick. I use SW Pro-Classic Latex when spraying trim and oil when brushing.

While were on the subject of spraying trim I have a question. What do you use to fill nail holes in trim?

I've tried painters putty but always leaves a divot. I have better luck with wood filler. I don't have much experience with new construction. We do primarily custom repaints.

Thanks
 

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Looking for best tip size to spray interior trim. I have a graco x5 and use use behr paint. I have a 313 but think maybe there's something better. I am new to spraying
313 is good. We also like to use a 311. Still gives you the 6" fan but a nice fine finish.

While were on the subject of spraying trim I have a question. What do you use to fill nail holes in trim?
I use this...


Fill the hole and leave it high. The I like to take a wood block and wrap a self stick palm sander sheet and wrap it around the wood block. When the drydex is dry, I sand it with the sanding block I made. I don't like to use sanding sponges because I feel it digs some of the filler out. This also could be me so I use the homemade sanding block to prevent the dig out from happening.
 

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...this reminds me, I've gotta get some gun filters for my spray gun before I spray some ceilings next week...I almost forgot!
Screened washers behind the tip are worth every dime they cost, and they don't cost that many dimes.

I prefer standard airless tips over reverse-a-tips (Graco RAC type tips), which you can spin around to unclog tip clogs and change tip size. Best investment you can make if you spray with standard airless tips.
I find RAC type reversable tips take longer to clean out at the end of the day, cost too much, and can get messy.
RAC tips ARE convenient when you need to go to other tip sizes during spraying, but I don't go to other tip sizes that often during my planned day of spraying large areas. The next day I'll attend to spraying trim or whatnot and maybe use a different tip size the entire day.
 

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. What do you use to fill nail holes in trim?

I've tried painters putty but always leaves a divot. I have better luck with wood filler. I don't have much experience with new construction. We do primarily custom repaints.
Wood filler doesn't shrink partially because it's a chemical cure rather than an air cure. It's much too slow applying it satisfactorily when filling numerous holes of different sizes on larger jobs. Wood filler is much more appropriate for stain work, not painting work.
 

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313 is good. We also like to use a 311. Still gives you the 6" fan but a nice fine finish.



I use this...


Fill the hole and leave it high. The I like to take a wood block and wrap a self stick palm sander sheet and wrap it around the wood block. When the drydex is dry, I sand it with the sanding block I made. I don't like to use sanding sponges because I feel it digs some of the filler out. This also could be me so I use the homemade sanding block to prevent the dig out from happening.
Ya, that lightweight spackle is good stuff. It's almost a trade off in time as to leaving it raised up a bit and sanding it down or just applying it over the same holes twice (after first fill dries and shrinks a little). If you're adept at using a putty knife, you can putty knife this stuff on twice (smooth and level) and not need to sand it afterwards (the 2nd pass will dry flush).

Larger areas needing filling, may of course, require more than just 2 quick passes. When patching larger holes, before painting final coat, do your best filling and sanding larger patches and then hit it with some paint to see if the patch is flush (use a flat paint on walls to be painted flat, not a hard drying stain killer-it may cause flash-shiner). Go over it again a few times with spackle if needed. Time Saver: position a portable hair dryer to dry the test paint ( spackle too) that you applied to see if the patch turned out flush. For deep patches, poke holes in the initial wet patch application with a large nail to help air get to the spackle which will help it dry faster before you apply another coat of spackle.
 
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