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Beginner here. What would be the optimal size for excavating foundation areas in avg 50x120 lots? The footings on average are not deeper than 10ft. The area of excavation on average is 40'x60'x10'. Would a 20ton be overkill or the right size? We are currently using 8ton with 36inch bucket and it seems like it's somewhat undersized for these jobs?
 

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150s are nice, legal width... no problem with basement excavations. Can pull behind tandem dump with tilt deck.

I ran 210s, but we also did sewer/ water main work.

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With a 150 to 200 sized machine, have more reach,, easier to cast material away from excavation or load trucks.

Still a size that's relatively easy to mobilize job to job.

CAT adds a 3 in front of their metric weight designation, why I don't know, so for example, their 320 is the same size class as other manufacturers 200 class.

I assume your 305 weighs approximately 5.5 metric ton?

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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12,500 lbs.


I think thats about 5.5 metric tons?

Didnt know that about how CAT numbers their machines. 👍
 

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350 is WAY overkill for residential work.

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it was a tree-fiddy joke $350.00 for a fifty ton back hoe?????

The more open the lot, the larger machine that will work.....

Many times a larger hoe can replace an truck loading track loader?

Rubber vs steel allow for crossing finished roads and drives........ Steel lower hourly costs maybe? less down time? I could see a large fleet having the same model in steel and in rubber versions.

At some size, hoes stop coming with a push blade option??? a carriage design for dozing will last longer then one not if not abused?

Soon No california back hoes under 25 hp with diesel engines, just electric/ battery?
 

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Personally, I'd never move a 350 sized excavator in for a 500 cubic yard basement excavation.

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Ask the dealers?

Watch the competition, copy the ones making good money with decent equipment.

Long term the profits of digging is from the resale of the overburden to 3rd parties,

this requires access to storage yards for months-years close to work areas.

Or infilling low lots to increase their market value.....again proximity is essential.

Bigger digger = more trucks needed if you are hauling away..........OTBE

The road to profits is running the machinery more hours in dry weather, maybe a half shift with older/ student help?
 

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Appears you're an idealist.

My 35 years in excavating business made me a realist.

Through those years of successes and failures I adapted my business plan to what worked best for MY operation. I could care less what competition charged, or what type, size, age equipment they ran.

You have to base pricing, procedures that work best for you in your local market.

You speak of selling excess fill material. My local market of 24k people and 100 plus homes going up a year, 9 times out of ten you either give away or pay to dispose of it. You just have to add those costs onto the customer you're working for. You won't find anyone here to pay you for it unless it's topsoil.

Trust me, when you're digging a basement on a lot with existing homes on each side, 9 foot side yard clearances, you wouldn't want a 350 there. Sometimes my 210s were borderline too large. Plus, other than over width permit, my machines were FAR easier to mobe to and from jobsites in developed areas.

Just my 2 cents.


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