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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious what the Drywall professionals who prime their own work Prefer.
Best brand ,and.....best value.
Thanks,
happy Cinco de Mayo.
 

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The USG Sheetrock brand Tuff-Hide is expensive, but it is a primer-surfacer, not just a primer. Going on at approximately 20-mils wet thickness, it cures to provide an almost-level-5 smoothness.

USG Sheetrock brand First Coat is a stepdown, not a surfacer, but a primer, and a good one.

These are both for smooth finish applications. Not that one could not use them for any of the sprayed and troweled (or not troweled) textured drywall going on today, but they would be a waste of money.

IMHO, the further down one gets into the sunbelt, the more the prevalence of textured drywall. The northeast, New England, upper midwest, pacific NW all are still doing smooth with square corners, while the warmer clime types seem to go for texture and round corners.
 

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I just started using pva primer. Real cheap and does it's job.

Zinser cover stain is decent along with kilz latex 2 if you want to stay cheap.

The best primer I ever used was sw new drywall primer, but it dosent come cheap.
 

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I just started using pva primer. Real cheap and does it's job.

...

along with kilz latex 2 if you want to stay cheap.
I dropped all PVA drywall primers, Kilz Latex2, and Kilz Premium for various performance reasons. Materials cost aren't the biggest consideration for me, I look for adhesion and flashing in critical lighting situations.

Pretty much everything around here is smooth finish and a lot of eggshell is used, so flashing is a big big deal.
 

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Zinsser Bullseye 123 Primer Sealer Stain Killer
I am a fan of Zinsser 123, and it's had a funny role in a few sales. Usually as part of a remodeling proposal I mention that everything will get primed with 123. A few homeowners have mentioned that they then went to another contractor and asked about primer specifically, and were told, no, it's too expensive, not necessary for their situation - essentially that their house wasn't good enough for the good stuff. That starts them wondering what else the guy's going to skimp on.
 

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I am a fan of Zinsser 123, and it's had a funny role in a few sales. Usually as part of a remodeling proposal I mention that everything will get primed with 123. A few homeowners have mentioned that they then went to another contractor and asked about primer specifically, and were told, no, it's too expensive, not necessary for their situation - essentially that their house wasn't good enough for the good stuff. That starts them wondering what else the guy's going to skimp on.
I can usually pick it up on sale at Menards every three or four weeks. I just pick up a few fivers.
 

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For new work with nice finishing and sanding: Valspar PVA. Been using it for a long time. It is economical and one of the best for new work. Tints really well.

New work with so so finishing and sanding: USG - First Coat. It is a bit costly, but it does hides a lot of small errors and paper burning from bad sanders. The product saves point up time.

Old work: Zinnser oil based depending on what is going on with the walls and ceilings. The oil base with cover over almost any stain there is. Zinnser 1-2-3 if I know that I don't need a oil based primer. 1-2-3 is also a great for a primer & final coat for ceilings. It dries out as white as any ceiling paint with good protection. I have used it to spray out a few workshops.
 

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I dropped all PVA drywall primers, Kilz Latex2, and Kilz Premium for various performance reasons. Materials cost aren't the biggest consideration for me, I look for adhesion and flashing in critical lighting situations.

Pretty much everything around here is smooth finish and a lot of eggshell is used, so flashing is a big big deal.

Eggshell is a PITA some times .......eh?
 

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The USG Sheetrock brand Tuff-Hide is expensive, but it is a primer-surfacer, not just a primer. Going on at approximately 20-mils wet thickness, it cures to provide an almost-level-5 smoothness.

USG Sheetrock brand First Coat is a stepdown, not a surfacer, but a primer, and a good one.

These are both for smooth finish applications. Not that one could not use them for any of the sprayed and troweled (or not troweled) textured drywall going on today, but they would be a waste of money.

IMHO, the further down one gets into the sunbelt, the more the prevalence of textured drywall. The northeast, New England, upper midwest, pacific NW all are still doing smooth with square corners, while the warmer clime types seem to go for texture and round corners.
I have not tried Tuff-Hide yet. Can a 440i pump handle it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Zinsser Cover Stain oil based is great, but hard to get in CA
What is the benefit of using an oil primer on new dw? No chance of paper rise?
Seems like a nightmare shooting 30 gallons of oil as fast as you can in a house with all the windows masked, SCBA or not. Yikes.
 

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What is the benefit of using an oil primer on new dw? No chance of paper rise?
Seems like a nightmare shooting 30 gallons of oil as fast as you can in a house with all the windows masked, SCBA or not. Yikes.
Great adhesion - it soaks in some, and then there is the stain blocking that comes naturally from oil paints. The surface won't absorb water out of the paint you put on over it, so better open time, possibly less flashing, etc, etc. You can also spec oil primer on outside walls in some areas to get the perm rating you want in a wall assembly, but if you do that, usually everything is going to get oil primer - saves having to install a separate moisture retarder. Not many people do this, though (I will).

Yeah, fumes are an issue, even with the lowered VOC formulations, which I don't think perform as well as the older formulations.
 

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Clean up with oil is more of a problem compared to water based. obviously. Brush and roll you can keep windows open, but even with windows closed, the fumes aren't too bad. The first time I sprayed 3 rooms with everything closed up tight using just a paper mask, I gassed myself pretty badly. The next thing I did was buy a real mask.
 
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