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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What type/brand of fittings are you framers using?

I used to use 1/4" I-M fittings, didn't pay any attention to brand, and was somewhat dissatisfied with the tendency of the fittings to uncouple when working up on roofs and up high. Also the air flow seemed a bit lacking so when I was going fast stapling roofs and whatever, I usually used a 3/8" flexeel hose with 1/4" fittings and it did alright.

A lot of the most productive and experienced framers in the area prefer 1/4" flexeel hoses with 3/8" Tru-Flate fittings, because the fittings allow somewhat higher air flow and they never uncouple. I switched over and was satisfied at first.

But lately the quality of the 3/8" T fittings has gone down the drain. Forney is the only company making that I am aware of, and recently they are only lasting about 1 or 2 months. The connections sometimes leak brand new. At $13 to $15 apiece on the female 3/8" fittings, they are becoming cost prohibitive. I am spending more on fittings than I do on sawblades.

So are any of you high volume framers having good luck with your fittings? I am thinking of switching out to 1/4" brass I-M fittings or maybe 1/4" brass Tru-Flate types. Just having a hard time triple and double-bumping studs and plates off at high speed when my fittings are leaking air, and getting sick of buying new fittings, and cussing when they start to leak.
 

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whatever brand I/M and U fittings home depot sells. they usually only last a few months. been told the ones from automotive stores last a lot longer but yet to test the theory since I always just grab the HD ones when I'm buying other stuff we need.
 

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As a production crew, we use a lot of hoses. Not uncommon to drag 10 100's out most days.
Are you plugged right into a compressor, or have a main line with a splitter?
We run a 1/2" mainline to a secondary air tank on the deck. Use 1/2" fittings on this to maintain max airflow.
All my hoses are 1/4" either poly or flexzilla's. Run 1/4" couplers from all of them as well. On all the hoses I choose and have had best luck with the expensive female quick connects that are purchased at a hydraulic supply shop. At about 15$ each they are expensive, but last about a year sometimes more. They rarely if ever become disconnected by accident. And they seem to take more abuse and wear then the cheaper ones. I was replacing the cheapie ones (Home Depot, princess auto ect) every 2-3 months at 5$ each or more.

I have a couple hoses that I am trying a new style which I think are called radical flow. Waiting to see durability over time. They are about 20-25$ each but are a ball less system supposed to flow a lot more volume.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Milton high flow V fittings is what you want
Great tip, thanks. I got anxious yesterday and bought a bunch of coilhose pneumatic megaflow fittings. They are probably similar to the milton high flow fittings. I'll give the megaflows a try and if they don't work out I will probably check out the Miltons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
As a production crew, we use a lot of hoses. Not uncommon to drag 10 100's out most days.
Are you plugged right into a compressor, or have a main line with a splitter?
We run a 1/2" mainline to a secondary air tank on the deck. Use 1/2" fittings on this to maintain max airflow.
All my hoses are 1/4" either poly or flexzilla's. Run 1/4" couplers from all of them as well. On all the hoses I choose and have had best luck with the expensive female quick connects that are purchased at a hydraulic supply shop. At about 15$ each they are expensive, but last about a year sometimes more. They rarely if ever become disconnected by accident. And they seem to take more abuse and wear then the cheaper ones. I was replacing the cheapie ones (Home Depot, princess auto ect) every 2-3 months at 5$ each or more.

I have a couple hoses that I am trying a new style which I think are called radical flow. Waiting to see durability over time. They are about 20-25$ each but are a ball less system supposed to flow a lot more volume.
Lately I typically run a 50 or 100 foot main hose, usually a 3/8" flexeel, to a 12 gallon secondary storage tank. From there we typically split off with two or 3 100' 1/4" hoses. I likewise run flexeel and flexzilla 1/4" hoses to the guns and I am on the fence. The flexzillas seem to have better air flow, but they are heavier and they hang harder when I am working in the air and constantly hanging my gun upside down and then grabbing it to shoot. Every time I hang the gun the heavier flexzillas have been slowly wearing out the female fitting that connects to the gun and the leaks have been developing rapidly. It's been driving me nuts. The 1/4" flexeels aren't as heavy so they don't start hanging as hard and wearing out the hose stiffener and warping the connection. I am hoping the coilhose pneumatic megaflows will be firmer and better milled. The Forney 3/8" T fittings have been noticeably poor quality lately, the metal deforms on the male connectors too easily.

I might have to look into your 1/2" lead hose idea, sounds like a great way to eliminate pressure drop to the tank. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Also. What air pressure are you using. Most guns say 100-120. We run 135-140. By the time the air is at the guns they are only seeing 115 at best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Also. What air pressure are you using. Most guns say 100-120. We run 135-140. By the time the air is at the guns they are only seeing 115 at best.
I have been remiss on that, I bought a Jenny 17 gallon compressor half a year ago and haven't tweeked the settings yet. So I'm still running it at factory setting, IIRC 125 psi max. I got to replace the outlet air pressure gauge (it was delivered with a broken gauge) and then I will crank it up to probably 135 and adjust the cut in pressure as well, it is still set at factory setting of 90 psi. Yeah I've been definitely dragging my feet there...
 
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