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When I judge a paint it's mainly based on how it applies, 2nd how it looks. Behr is horrible to work with it's like spreading tar. No paints are as good as they used to be, companys keep buying others and not changing products for the better.

Advance is okay overated it does not lay down to my standards and I question the durability. I'm using B&M now because my options are getting thin they have junk like everyone else.
Yep. Every time I paint, it's like needing to learn all over again. Paints I used to love, suddenly don't work, or run all over.

It is frustrating to say the least.

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When I judge a paint it's mainly based on how it applies, 2nd how it looks. Behr is horrible to work with it's like spreading tar. No paints are as good as they used to be, companys keep buying others and not changing products for the better.

Advance is okay overated it does not lay down to my standards and I question the durability. I'm using B&M now because my options are getting thin they have junk like everyone else.
I'm a little surprised by your comments about Advance. I just shot seven doors with it and I've never seen better. It laid down perfectly smooth. As good as I would expect to see on high end cabinets. I used a cheap home owner grade airless (that's done absolutely outstanding service) with a 315 tip and whatever half pressure on that cheap sprayer is.
Even the stuff we brushed laid down very well. It's my go to for doors and trim now.
 

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No joke, I think the best prep for old weathered wood is deck brightener that uses lye. It will take off all the degraded fibers, unlike sanding or power washing.

The other thing I do based on FPL testing is put 1 coat of semitransparent 100% acrylic stain as a primer, then wait some months to a year before top coats. It gets better adhesion on weathered wood than oil primer.
 

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I'm a little surprised by your comments about Advance. I just shot seven doors with it and I've never seen better. It laid down perfectly smooth. As good as I would expect to see on high end cabinets. I used a cheap home owner grade airless (that's done absolutely outstanding service) with a 315 tip and whatever half pressure on that cheap sprayer is.
Even the stuff we brushed laid down very well. It's my go to for doors and trim now.
Advance doesn't lay down smooth on all surfaces spraying is different. It doesn't lay down like some water based in the past and of course nothing like a good oil base. Pratt & Lambert sells Aquanamel which In my opinion is better than Advance problem is P&L doesn't have the popularity as BM in my area so my supplier doesn't carry it since he became a BM dealer.

I've used Advance several times and it's WTF this stuff is crap other times it's fine. When you been doing this as long as I have you realize todays paints just aren't up to par. The standard for an excellent paint job is much lower today and that's got a lot to do with crap we have to work with and most painters suck.
 

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And a lot of people who paint don't pay too much attention to choosing a brush and rolled cover. Especially with the current crop of water based paints.
 

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Find the local rep for one of the major paint suppliers (PPG, SW, BM). Let them tell you what to do. As noted above, Red is tough. I did some big box stores a couple years ago that used Red as their primary color. The paint had to be tinted from the factory -- local stores wouldn't do it.
 

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I agree. That red barn looks out-of-paint for years. Some wood structures left this way over prolonged periods have a greater tendency to peel again.
Wood fibers on the surface degrade, and peel off easier than primer to sound wood. It's basically a very porous compromised surface you're putting paint on.
 

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Wood fibers on the surface degrade, and peel off easier than primer to sound wood. It's basically a very porous compromised surface you're putting paint on.
I would argue some woods left neglected in this way may become almost adhesion-resistant deeper than the surface. They may look great when done but give them a few months after final cleanup and dramatic peeling begins. Even if pressure washed, high grade primers, etc.

Ran into a rare case pre-2000. A single story by the ocean. Of course the salt air acting on the exposed wood cells may have had something to do with it. But the home was left weather worn (especially fascia) probably 15 - 20 years. Different painters gave their best shot at it, pressure washing, applying acrylic and oil primers, nothing seemed to work. I won't work on a structure this weathered again...
 
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