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For me, it depends on some factors. Am I trying to just keep the dust down or do I have to totally eliminate it, also demo dust and sanding dust can be pretty different in how invasive they can be.

If I'm just trying to keep the dust down, such as a remodel where there is already some dust from other projects and the homeowners know that dust is part of the project, then closing the door might be all that you do, and add a box fan to the window to direct the dust out.

If I need to eliminate the dust from moving into the rest of the house, then I would close the door and tape a plastic sheet on the out side of the door sealing the room with blue painter's tape, add a fan to the window. If there is no door then seal the doorway with a plastic sheet, if there is no door way, then I would look to a product by Fastcap call The 3rd Hand and build a dust wall with those.

There are also powered dust collectors that you can set in a room if you really are a pro.

For me, keeping dust from moving to other parts of the house is just part of the job. When I'm doing stain grade, high-end wood work such as boxed ceilings or custom hardwood panelling or built-ins, getting the dust out of the room I am working in is the main concern so the finish comes out as expected. Vacuum, vacuum and vacuum somemore, after each coat and sanding.
 

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Need more info. Will you be working in the room? What type of floor covering? Carpet, tile, wood?
 

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Simple! Buy a plastic sheet and blue tape it on all 4 sides. Then buy an adhesive zipper that costs about $5. The zipper fastens to the plastic sheet then you cut a slit and you have an instant method of dust prevention.

This is how I am protecting my house from my kitchen dust. I have drop cloths and runners for the high traffic areas and a welcome mat directly as you step out of the zippered room.

If we are replacing a window or something there isn't much dust. We use drop cloths and runners at the high traffic areas and directly at the window location.
 

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Mike I'll post some pics sometime soon. I'm half way through the kitchen project waiting on the cabinets to arive in 2 1/2 more weeks. The first time I saw a zipper like this one I said to myself "why didn't I think of that?!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thansk for the ideas!
I'm adding a walk-in-closet and master bath.
During the process I will need to tear down a section of a wall then put up drywall and sand. Because this is a bedroom I wanted to eliminate as much dust as possible.

I really like the 3rd hand deal. I was thinking about using my floor jack with a stud to hold up tarp with either a pipe or 2x4 - creating a wall.

How does the adhesive zipper work?
 

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We make inexpensive "third hands" by using 1" PVC pipe & adjustable shower curtain rods. Cut PVC 5' long for standard ceilings, drill a hole 10" from the top and put a stove bolt through. Remove largest plastic end from shower curtain rod and insert into PVC, screw out the rod to the length needed to hold the plastic to the ceiling, then install the plastic zipper. Costs about $8.00 each pole.
 

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I really like the zipper idea, havent seen one though. I do a lot of work for a hypochondriac who is allergic to almost all types of air. I put visqueen on the floor and then put damp towels on top of it, I don't think that it does much but it puts her mind to ease and she keeps calling me back.
 

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Grumpy, I would if I thought that she had a ligitmate complaint but I see her around town at restaurants with dirt parking lots and out and about when the pollen count is going through the roof. Can't let your maladies interfere with your partying!
I just do as she asks, the damp towels were her idea. Any conception of how much dust is on the rest of you after sanding drywall for a few hours? She doesn't and hasn't said a word, only concerned about the soles of our shoes.
Hasn't had any kind of an attack while we were on the job either.
 

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LOL sanding drywall is next in my kitchen project. I have hit a low point waiting for the cabinets and I am not looking forward to the sanding. Sure I have dust control BUT I still have to be in that crap while I am sanding. I hate that. I've done it often enough to know drywall installer is one job I never want.
 

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Mike I do very little interior work. Perhaps the only interior work I do is on my own home. I've no concept of how to wet sand drywall. I have wet sanded metal on automobiles :)

Anyways the room is completely isolated. I think I am going to buy a hose extension for my vacuum and connect the sander to it. I may even buy a second wet dry vac and let it run sucking up as much dust as possible :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mike Finley said:
I haven't sanded a mudded wall in 6 years. I converted to wet sanding with a sponge and texturing long, long ago, never looked back or missed that nasty chore.
How does wet sanding work?
I don't believe I've seen any reference to this before.

My wife doesn't really like the sprayed on texture so whatever I do I will need to sand.
 

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Wet sanding is pretty easy, however you will never get the perfectly smooth finish you will get with dry sanding. That is why since I texture anyways, sanding perfectly smooth is a waste of time for me and wet sanding works so well.

There is no secret to it, you don't use sand paper, just a sponge, like a grout sponge. Put on your first coat, then let it set up, don't let it dry completely, just let it set up and harden, then with a bucket of water and a sponge go over it and wet sand it smooth, then put on your next coat, do the same, ect.

If you aren't going to texture you can sand the final coat, but save yourself a ton of dust and time by wet sanding the other coats.

Pros don't use this technique because they put their coats on so damn smooth they barely need to sand anyways!
 
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