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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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They look great Tom, How do you like them? Are they heavy?
I have yet to see them in person. All I did was go to his FB business page and steal the photos to post here.

I know Brian and we will be working on a project together in a few months. At that time I'll get to see and use his horses (if he lets me).

As it has been described to me, the large ones in the first photo are 1/2 a sheet of 3/4" plywood. The weight is reduced with all the holes and slots machined in the pieces. All those slots and holes do have a purpose. I'm not sure how much material is in the smaller units.

The article in Fine Homebuilding is a couple of pages, I'm sure Brian does a great job explaining the units.

Tom
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Hey Tom and Tom and company,

The short horse (4') weighs 30 lbs. The Long Heavy Horse weighs in at 46 lbs. With all the holes working as handles they are pretty easy to get hold of and carry around, despite being stout horses.

I did submit more photos and text than FHB published, they didn't want to publish too much on saw horses. Can't blame them, it does't seem like too interesting a topic.

Let me know if you have other questions. I have a lot more photos too.

Here is a pic of the basic horse showing how they work for clamping work and hanging tools in reach, but out of the way.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...540263.-2207520000.1379445894.&type=3&theater
 

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Look super handy!

Is there an u stability problems with the 3 legged stand over the 4 legged stand? Especially on uneven ground or setting up in the lawn/yard?

Any dimensional drawings/plans floating around out there for these or something similar? I've been in the market for a super sturdy set or two of horses. I have one set of Great Whites and can't find them anymore.

Thanks
Ron
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Look super handy!

Is there an u stability problems with the 3 legged stand over the 4 legged stand? Especially on uneven ground or setting up in the lawn/yard?

Any dimensional drawings/plans floating around out there for these or something similar? I've been in the market for a super sturdy set or two of horses. I have one set of Great Whites and can't find them anymore.

Thanks
Ron
The idea behind the 3-legged plan was the improved stability on uneven terrain. The short horse is very stable. With the long horse, I often use it with the short horse and the two are clamped together (I put two sets of pipe clamp ends on each of the pipes, so they attach to both horses). Together the two horses are super stable.

The FHB article has a basic plan for the horse, but they did alter my drawing to make it look cooler, I guess and the legs are all the same length. In reality, the angled legs need to be made 1-1/4" longer (31-1/4") to work with the 30" tall third leg on the rail. I hope that makes sense.

If there is enough interest in the plans, I will make them available as downloadable PDF's for a modest fee. Might also build up the horses and see how they sell at trade shows, etc.
 

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I've been lurking on Basswoods FaceBook page and love his work:thumbsup:
 
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Artisan Carpentry
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I just checked and my Long Heavy Horse only weighs about half as much as many of the popular steel miter saw stands, and it takes up less room because it packs flatter.

Here is a shot of the legs with rails and legs stored flat on the wall in the background. Also a photo of the long horse as a door bench:
 

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BS are those 15º slots you put in there to catch the legs?
 

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BS are those 15º slots you put in there to catch the legs?
Yes those are 15* slots. The main rail leg is 30" tall on my version and the angled double-leg is about 31-1/4" tall, due to the slope distance being greater than the vertical distance. If you are taller than me and want to go taller on the third leg you will have to figure out how tall to make the double leg component to go with it.
 

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Thanks Bass:thumbsup: I'm about 5'10" tall and find a 32" saw horse a good working hight. ??
 
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