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I am trying to make sure I can stay busy this fall. I have done a decent amount of masonry work. I've rebuilt a bunch of old stoops in the past, can lay block, stone etc. I am interested in getting into chimney repair as I assume my masonry skills would easily transfer over.

So lets say someone has a brick chimney where the brick is poping off of it in the top 5 feet. Whats the correct method to repair this?
 

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i guess it depend on how long you want it to last

seems to me that sounds like you would want to pull it down to soild then rebuild it

but i guess every job is different
 

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In that case I would do like tomstruble more than likely. I would tear it down to where the brick arent rotting out and rebuild up. Remember in your bid that the chimneys you'll be repairing have filler brick added in to keep the flu upright and give extra strength to the chimney. I usually figure on replacing some sections of flu as well. Then remember its alot longer setup time as opposed to doing regular work. You need to have a safe solid platform. Figure out where you can run your plank and also time to lay down protection for the shingles to keep them clean and scuff free.

Its no walk in the park I guarantee that.
 

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popping off??

Im guessing you mean to say they are spalling???? If they are " popping off " you have problems....Probably have a soft brick not meant for exterior abuse...that means probably rebuilding from roofline...it's a bit of a leap from steps to chimneys, think about hiring one of the million unemployed brickies to do the actual laying up, and watch....as they say, it ain't rocket science....
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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http://www.maconline.org/tech/design/fireplace1/fireplace1.html


http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/technote.htm

http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/technote.htm


I have seen your stuff posted and checked out your website before. Not a doubt in my mind you can add this to your services offered.

Lots of chimneys need work, most of it is hard to get at and there is a certain amount of liability to be concerned with when you start replacing liners and such. That all leads up to not a lot of contractors willing to work on existing stuff and usually a pretty good profit margin.

Flashing detail at the roof line is a big source of water leaks. Once the brick start failing on the outside, the inside is usually gone also. often the damage is limited to above the roof line, because the higher room temps of attic and house along with less weather exposure means less freeze/thaw cycles and less damage.

Always use cement for a wash and try to sell a maintenance program of inspection and sealing on a regular basis. Can be a steady supply of business if you get a name for it.

I think working with a sweep would be a great idea as they can give a certificate of safety and a video of the inside and you can maintain the outside. Just get one that doesn't want to compete with you for the repairs.

I been taking lots of pics this year, I can give you an idea what you can expect when you open one up. (no pics of the one that was home to about 5,000 bats though. That was nasty...)
 
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I've done some chimney re-lays. And re-lined some chimneys with a chimney-sweep friend. I don't know about the re-lining. The re-lining guy didn't know masonry. If you are qualified for masonry and team up with a chimney sweep, I think there is a lot of work in caps, re-lining, rebuilds (re-laying) and tuckpointing.

You might also connect with people selling wood burners and other burners.

You should have scaffolding and masonry equipment and be well versed in flashing.
 

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I agree with what 6string & dakzaag posted.

I would add that it is critical to have the right equipment at your disposal. I highly recommend that you get & learn how to properly set up and use a chicken ladder, ridge hooks, roof jacks & chimney scaffolding:thumbsup:
 

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Chicken Ladder?
 
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