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Im bidding on a basement remodel which includes recessed lights, and some outlets and switches. I figured pulling new homeruns was in order, and since the panel in close it would be easy. Question is, Can i perform this work myself, not being an electrician. I have done some extensive wiring for myself in the past so Im not doubting my ability. I will be pulling permits for this job and was wondering if I was going to have any problems with the electrical part. I live in delaware by the way, if that matters.

Jason
 

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This is a question more for your local AHJ.
 
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you'll need a licensed electrician-the inspector will come out for the electrical rough in and you are not permitted to do the work and won't get a green sticker.

a HO in delaware can do his own work (his OWN residence) and when you call in the final (inspection), the inspector will look for a inspection sticker from a company certifying the work was done properly. I seem to recall First State Inspection is one of the recommended inspection services. Also...the HO must apply with the electircal board stating they are doing their own electrical work-it costs a few bucks too.
 

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If it looks like a quick easy job, just carry it in your bid to have an electrician do the job right. Every time a homeowner or contractor has "helped" me by doing some of the job it has ended up taking longer so I could tear it out and do it right. I am going to a job tomorrow morning where the guy says that he did the wiring himself and just needs someone to connect two 20/1 breakers. I told him that if I was ging to do it, I will charge 3 hours labor @ $65/hr so find someone closer if that's a problem or if he didn't figure that cost in. He said that's fine, and I've never even met the guy. The referral wasn't even someone I have done work for.
 

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You are bidding a basement job, If you are not an electrician you are not going to be able to pull any permits, you are not the ho. Get a Good Electrician and start using him on all your work. Will give you good peace of mind. and you will be doing things the correct way.
 

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Here you can't charge someone to change out a receptacle unless you are licensed to do so. If you're gonna keep doing this sort of stuff you are going to need a friendly sparky so you might as well get one on board now. :thumbsup:
 

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Here's a question:

Is it legitimate to pay an electrical contractor (or any sub for that matter) to consult prior to and then inspect your work for the sake of permits? I knew a general a few years back that had a licensed electrician that he would do this with. He'd call the electrician, work out an amount, have the electrician consult him on anything out of the ordinary, pull the permit, the general did the work, and the electrician inspected it for a fee. The electrician got paid pretty well for the inspection and the general paid himself some wages. It seemed to work out pretty well for all involved, but I could see how it might be against the law.
 

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but I could see how it might be against the law.
That's funny as in funny stupid. If the electrician's name is on the permit, the house burns and kills an occupant and upon closer inspection wiring is found to be faulty, it would lead back to the electrician.

Question: if the GC did the work which was found to be faulty, would the electrician's policy get the hit b/c he put his name on it?
 

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Legally I believe it would go to the electrician. The electrician was responsible for the inspecting and testing the work done by the GC. The electrician was able to inspect all the work done before rock went up, and then he verified all the circuits were working properly once switches and fixtures were installed. My question though is whether or not this is an illegal practice.

Here's why I ask: I can wire basic residential circuits all day long. I've done it countless times working under a licensed electrician as his employee. Now if I, as an unlicensed employee, can wire circuits and have them inspected by my licensed boss, why can't a third party such as the GC do the same?
 

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Because when you work for an electrical contractor there is a reasonable expectation that you either know what the heck your doing after a little while, or you were canned before you do any real damage. The scenario you described is not very logical. I can fly a stealth bomber on playstation, why can't I in real life?
 

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Here I believe there is some verbage stating that the electrician can have anyone he wants do the work.

The scenario you have explained makes sense to me. I was in the same boat a few weeks ago. I was stuck with the recently changed rules and was told I needed a "master" electrician to sign the service agreement with the electrical company.

These changed rules didn't seem fair to me because I was allowed to do this work until March of 2009. So the changes would take this ability away from me. I did some checking around and just looked at the law, and there were provisions for "special" electricians to do residential work. My work experience qualified me, so I applied and will receive this license.

But before I had knowledge of this, I wanted to do exactly as you proposed: find an electrician to pull the permit, oversee me, and sign off on it. The problem I had was finding an electrician because they have it set up now so that the electrician has to be a "master" plus have a business license. Apparently they don't want just any "master" pulling permits. What do I know, maybe if a "master" working for another "master" gets his business license and starts doing jobs on the weekends, he will soon no longer be employed. Plus he would have to carry insurance. Your normal working stiff with no ambition isn't going to pay the 300 or whatever for his business license plus pay another $750 or so for the insurance to get started because he can't find that cash anywhere. Even if he did, he'd better get it all paid for on the first job, because he won't get another job until someone like you "forces" it on him.

So check into the law and see for yourself if you can become a licensed electrician.
 
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