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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been given the chore to replace 2 windows for a homeowner. The PVC windows have nailing flanges that are too wide for the opening. The window itself without the flange is 1" too narrow in width and depth. The old window bucks have wood frames set in the concrete of the basement. Can someone help in pointing me on the correct way to install this window. I was thinking I had to take off the flange and somehow adhere the raw window(without nailing flange) into the opening. Maybe install PT plywood in the opening but that's only 1/2" on all sides. Then I still have to figure out how to get the jamb adhered to the new buck. The PVC window is a hollow frame. So screwing into its sides and top is not going to work. I've cruised the forum here and You tube but not much luck.
 

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PCI
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As Tom said, you need to knock out the mortar slopes. That is if you say you have a full 1" in height and width.

Then frame opening with pt 1x with adhesive and masonry nails to hold until adhesive sets. You may need to plane the pt 1x to the right thickness to fit the window.

Then you can use the nailing flange to attach window. Then trim out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Only thing is, if I knock out the mortar slopes the window will be pretty close to ground level.
*** Starting over with the correct window is not an option. This window was ordered as small as is possible with an egress opening.
 

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Only thing is, if I knock out the mortar slopes the window will be pretty close to ground level.
*** Starting over with the correct window is not an option. This window was ordered as small as is possible with an egress opening.
Don't know about in Canada , but no way here does that window even come close to being egree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Because its a replacement you can get away with it. Yet the guy that lives there could probably only get his toe through the opening. 6'4" 250 lbs. I watched him eat a whole watermelon in 1 sitting. Yet he looks like an athlete. That I don't get.
I think the idea is to get rid of the rot with new. Not what I would do but I just do as I'm asked.
 

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I can't see the size and details of what you are doing there, but I've replaced a lot of windows which go in the space of 4 concrete blocks.

I cut off the nailing flanges and drill weep holes in the bottom of the window as per the instructions.

I put some shim type material on the sill to center the window in the opening up and down.

I stuff fiberglass insulation all around the window loosely, then I go around the inside with backer rod, pulling the shims as I go.

Then I go to the outside and put backer rod all around, recessed in enough to allow for a bead of caulk. I caulk them and walk away.

When I first started installing these, I would put a screw in each jamb into a plug set in the mortar joint. Now I do without.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I can't see the size and details of what you are doing there, but I've replaced a lot of windows which go in the space of 4 concrete blocks.

I cut off the nailing flanges and drill weep holes in the bottom of the window as per the instructions.

I put some shim type material on the sill to center the window in the opening up and down.

I stuff fiberglass insulation all around the window loosely, then I go around the inside with backer rod, pulling the shims as I go.

Then I go to the outside and put backer rod all around, recessed in enough to allow for a bead of caulk. I caulk them and walk away.

When I first started installing these, I would put a screw in each jamb into a plug set in the mortar joint. Now I do without.
This sounds right up my alley. To boot the window has weep holes built in.
 

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The type of window that I get here can be mounted so that the sash tilts down or lifts up. Theoretically, you could also mount it sideways and have the sash open in to the right or left. That is why you have to drill your own weep holes.

These sell for about $60 and replace the old mortared in iron ones with thermoglass and a nice clean look. The screens pop out and they are handy as hell to move stuff in/out of the basement with.
 

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Take a look at Dupont Straight Flash VF Once you remove the flange it help to create a flange to bridge the gap also ck out Dupont Flex Wrap for the Sill


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well I thought I would reply back. After all the assistance I got.
I got the old out and had only 3/8" on either side and 1/4" top and below. I cut the flange off. Put 6 big headed screws into the frame of the new window sticking out so they rubbed into the concrete and kept the window firm and true in the R.O.. Took PL Premium 8x and ran a huge 1/2" thick bead in the entire frame circumference of where the screws would seat. Pop the frame in and plumbed it up. I'll be back in the am to caulk the gap in between the window frame and concrete with M1 from outside and inside.:thumbup:
 
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