Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Question? If I am framing a basement with 2x4's, I have chalked the lines on the floor, marked and secured the floor plates and now am ready to place the top plates. I plum up to place my top plate but all I get is air space, either because I fell between two joist or because I am parrallel to to the joist. How do I determine where my end point is so that my top plate falls directly over my bottom plate. Thank you very very much in advance. :confused:
 

·
General Contractor
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
Best thing to do is frame a wall 1-1/2" low of hitting the joists. Stand the wall and brace it. Where you're perpendicular to the joists you can put in another top plate to get to the bottom of the joists. If you're parallel and are in between 2 joists - put blocking between the joists flush with the bottom of the joists.. stand the wall.. and put in your 1-1/2" top plate. Put the blocking at 24" o.c. to faciliate the installation of drywall.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
contractor

If you are falling into a gap at the top because of cieling joist placement, then you can block out between the joists. Then stand your wall , level it and mark it level onto blocks (cats) and nail to cats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
where walls hit center of joist, block 2' center between joist,use straight 2x4 and level mark where wall hits on ceiling chalk lines. or use plate level
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
sbrown880 said:
Question? If I am framing a basement with 2x4's, I have chalked the lines on the floor, marked and secured the floor plates and now am ready to place the top plates. I plum up to place my top plate but all I get is air space, either because I fell between two joist or because I am parrallel to to the joist. How do I determine where my end point is so that my top plate falls directly over my bottom plate. Thank you very very much in advance. :confused:
What you really need is a pls "self leveling plumb laser". And this is why metal studs are ideal for basements there more expensive now but far more efficient. You dont have to wory about treated sole plate. There allways as straight as a arrow. You dont have to worry about a huge blazing inferno in youre basement while your sleeping at night. You can cut twenty studs on the chop saw at once. You can snap all your lines on the ground and just as fast put your top track up. Simply by putting your laser on your line. It takes seconds to cut ears on your track to make headers. You might want to put 2x4's in doorways for partition bucks but thats all. Trim will go on just as easy by frog legging your nails and nails will shoot into 25ga. steel. And you can carry in 20 studs at once. Its definitly twice as fast.
http://www.contractortalk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=279&stc=1[IMG]
put your wall tie or gusset up and shoot the laser
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
"PARROTHE" ha ha. my buddy at work just called me PEDRO NEVAJAS. padrotthe de la noce. good stuff! new here guys. definitely side with the metal studs. used to do residential wood framing, now do commercial metal (union) definately faster and easier.make for a better finished product also(IMHO)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
Lay your top and bottom plate ontop of each other on the ground. Measure up off the top plate to the bottom of your joist. Take measurements along the whole plate and find your common lenght. You don't have to make them tight to the joists, there not structual. Get within a 1/4" or better and you have your stud length. Build them on the ground and stand them up. Put in blocking for walls running with the joists and nail to the bottom of joists running perpendicular. Much faster than nailing bottom and top plate in place and fill framing. Stronger nailing connection to, two nails through each plate into the top and bottom of stud.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top